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Old 10-01-2017, 01:32 PM   #16
day004
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Originally Posted by OaklandF4i View Post
While I agree with DataDan that delta speed wont solve everything,
.
But Delta is the low hanging fruit that is the most easily changed.

It also changes dramatically the physics of the impact.

Sure it wont take the cellphone/cigarette/newspaper/razor/hairbrush/eyeliner/drumsticks/rubics cubes/sandwich/coffee cup etc out of car drivers hands but it is the component that the rider owns 100%.

Lastly , it doesn't matter who's at fault, the rider is the one most likely to die or be substantially hurt. Riders must take full responsibility for what happens when they choose to laneshare.
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Old 10-01-2017, 01:34 PM   #17
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I agree that the delta is the easiest to address. They will make other aspects safer to deal with. Start there. Gain situational experience and move forward as a safer commuter.
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Old 10-03-2017, 11:38 AM   #18
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A pet peeve of mine is the people who swerve sharply onto the shoulder at the last minute to give you room. Like, I appreciate your concern, but it tells me that you clearly didn't see me at first, you overreacted, and now you're driving on the shoulder...where there's frequently debris, which you are now kicking up, and if there's something ahead of you on the shoulder that I don't see (ie, a bumper or something from a previous accident), I don't know that you won't swerve BACK towards me equally suddenly.
That exactly how I nearly got a piece of sheet-rock to the faceshield during one morning's commute...driver (in a work truck) put two wheels over the breakdown line in the first lane and his rear tire spat up all sorts of debris, including said piece of sheet-rock. Appreciate the room but I don't need so much space that I could fit my Tacoma through that gap.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:51 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by budman View Post
Lanesplitting is a dangerous activity. In particular for a new rider with little experience with commute traffic.

There are so many subtle things to be aware of. So many situations to be aware of.

If you click Features (one of the blue tabs at the top of this page) you will find a document with my advice. It is only advice, but it is better than the guidelines IMO as far as identifying dangerous situations.

Please remember... I have ridden for almost 50 years and my opinion can be too agressive for a new rider. It is still worth a peek.
Thanks for the link and the article- always good to try and be safer!
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Old 10-18-2017, 06:38 PM   #20
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I don't think any delta can make up for the skills required to read the traffic. This is why new riders should be restricted from the freeway. Let them develop these skills on the surface streets where a mistake isn't likely to kill them.
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Old 10-23-2017, 08:33 AM   #21
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CA:
Rider appears to be traveling too fast.
Splitting at the place where traffic first builds up is very risky. Drivers are more likely to jump lanes as they approach the traffic jam. Wait a few seconds, let the cars bunch up and eliminate the gaps. Let the drivers get used to the traffic before splitting.
+1 on this! Right when people see cars piling up is when they usually start jumping lanes. anything to get 2 cars farther up in line

There is a really bad intersection near my house thats the one place i almost never split in. Its a large intersection with multiple turn lanes, then right as you make it through the lane, there are two freeway onramps.

This constantly causes a cluster F#$% of drivers jumping from lane to lane trying to get on the freeway, or stomping the breaks so they can make the left turn into the taco bell. I do everything I can to avoid that intersection completely if at all possible.
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Old 10-23-2017, 11:18 AM   #22
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Splitting at the place where traffic first builds up is very risky. Drivers are more likely to jump lanes as they approach the traffic jam. Wait a few seconds, let the cars bunch up and eliminate the gaps. Let the drivers get used to the traffic before splitting.
THIS!!! I often see (and have done in my rookie years) riders start splitting at a very high delta at the start of the split, then slow down a few cars after. I am not sure why this is, but I think we try to maintain the speed we previously had AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. Maybe change is hard? Especially when slowing when all you want to do is go fast? Lack of focus to preemptively figure it out? I am not sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
I think the delta is only part of it. Sure, there are crashes that could have been prevented just by a reasonable delta. This one (Fresno) possibly, and the one on 880 in San Jose that Enchanter posted a video of in a Crash Analysis thread. But there are situations where the delta isn't as important. When both lanes are bumper-to-bumper and no one can change lanes, a higher delta is possible. So I see it as a more general problem in situational awareness.

In my unpublished, 3500-word Lane Splitting Guide (yeah, it's a bit tedious ), I emphasize:
  1. Attitude. Accept an increase in some risks in order to reduce others and to save time. Accept the leisurely approach to driving of most other road users. Accept that you're putting yourself in spots where you won't be seen.

  2. Know the common crash scenarios. Know how lane-splitting crashes happen, and be on high alert when you identify a high-risk situation.

  3. Know the high-danger road situations. A careless lane change is a common cause of freeway lane splitting crashes. Where do drivers change lanes? Where flows converge or diverge. Where a merge lane ends. At an exit-only lane. Where there is a big lane-to-lane speed delta. When there's a disabled vehicle. Where a car-pool lane begins or ends. Etc., etc.

  4. Know the non-freeway splitting dangers. When traffic is bumper-to-bumper, you're protected from crossing hazards. But as you clear the adjacent traffic, watch for peds, bicyclists, and vehicles crossing your path.
Dan, you are an asset to this community!
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Old 10-25-2017, 07:25 AM   #23
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......


Dan, you are an asset to this community!
Yes, this, about DataDan. Truly!
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Old 05-12-2018, 07:29 PM   #24
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Some excellent advice on this thread and a great summary by DataDan.
I have now been commuting and lane sharing daily up and down the Bay, 101, 880, 580, for close to 20 years without a single crash.

While I would love to share a magic recipe, I am all too aware that some of it comes down to good luck. With that out of the way, I would add the following to what Data Dan and OaklandF4i said:

- Focus: regardless of how little you slept, how early you woke up, how long of a working day you had, how upset your wife or co-worker made you or where you need to get to, when you get on the bike, take 10sec to take a breath, clear your head and get all your attention on riding and on the road.

- Always look for escape paths: If the path between two cars closes at the last minute, getting on the brakes is rarely the best option. More often than not you won't stop in time. It's much better to have identified another path ahead of time and quickly switch.

- Whats legal is not always the safest option: I know I am going to get crap for that one, I am not advocating breaking the law, I am merely saying that following yellow lines can be a form of target fixation. When looking for escape paths also consider shoulders or wherever there might be space you can use in a pinch.

- Be razor accurate with your steering: For example practice riding on a line at different speeds, with wind, without wind. Be mindful of the turbulences created by large vehicles, they will push or pull you, anticipate and keep your wheels exactly where you want them to be. An inch can be the difference between staying up or going down. Again I am not advocating getting within one inch of a car, simply to steer as if all you had was an inch rather than being lulled into steering sloppily just because there is space.

- Be decisive: I see everyday riders hanging a few feets away to the rear right corner of cars. Waiting for who knows what sign that it is safe to pass. If you are not ready to pass stay at a safe distance from the car ahead of you. Once you are ready to pass, whatever it means, you made eye contact with the driver, the gap between cars has widen, etc. pass decisively.

As Budman mentioned earlier, none of these "techniques" are meant for new riders, or riders with little experience.

My 2 cents.
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Last edited by krongsak; 05-12-2018 at 07:36 PM..
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Old 05-12-2018, 07:58 PM   #25
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Been "sharing" for 15 yrs, 5 days a week... I've taken a few hits doing so...DataDan's insights require you to think, but omg he has got it nailed
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Old 05-12-2018, 08:04 PM   #26
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Data-dan nailed it, but id like to add:

always cover both brakes at all times
and...
situational awareness isnt enough. you need anticipational awareness as well.
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Old 05-13-2018, 07:16 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by krongsak View Post
Some excellent advice on this thread and a great summary by DataDan.
I have now been commuting and lane sharing daily up and down the Bay, 101, 880, 580, for close to 20 years without a single crash.

While I would love to share a magic recipe, I am all too aware that some of it comes down to good luck. With that out of the way, I would add the following to what Data Dan and OaklandF4i said:

- Focus: regardless of how little you slept, how early you woke up, how long of a working day you had, how upset your wife or co-worker made you or where you need to get to, when you get on the bike, take 10sec to take a breath, clear your head and get all your attention on riding and on the road.

- Always look for escape paths: If the path between two cars closes at the last minute, getting on the brakes is rarely the best option. More often than not you won't stop in time. It's much better to have identified another path ahead of time and quickly switch.

- Whats legal is not always the safest option: I know I am going to get crap for that one, I am not advocating breaking the law, I am merely saying that following yellow lines can be a form of target fixation. When looking for escape paths also consider shoulders or wherever there might be space you can use in a pinch.

- Be razor accurate with your steering: For example practice riding on a line at different speeds, with wind, without wind. Be mindful of the turbulences created by large vehicles, they will push or pull you, anticipate and keep your wheels exactly where you want them to be. An inch can be the difference between staying up or going down. Again I am not advocating getting within one inch of a car, simply to steer as if all you had was an inch rather than being lulled into steering sloppily just because there is space.

- Be decisive: I see everyday riders hanging a few feets away to the rear right corner of cars. Waiting for who knows what sign that it is safe to pass. If you are not ready to pass stay at a safe distance from the car ahead of you. Once you are ready to pass, whatever it means, you made eye contact with the driver, the gap between cars has widen, etc. pass decisively.

As Budman mentioned earlier, none of these "techniques" are meant for new riders, or riders with little experience.

My 2 cents.

This is a great post, all of it.
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Old 05-13-2018, 08:34 AM   #28
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Good thread, but I find the single most important note missing;

"Fear the gap"

If there's a gap ahead, your lane or adjoining lane, you can count on someone diving into it as soon as humanly possible. No signal, no looking over their shoulder- its a scientific fact- gaps create a vacuum that folks are sucked into without any input or reasoning. If there is no gap, well folks tend not to power on over- but some will anyway.

Know this behavior and I think you'll avoid most incidents.
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Old 05-13-2018, 06:04 PM   #29
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sad to hear another rider gone.

but to those who say never to a big rig.
as a commercial driver i will give way for a bike. but some are splitting way too fast for me to see them let alone move over a bit for there safety.

but double yes, you never want to go under a rig.
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Old 05-31-2018, 10:40 AM   #30
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This thread is very good. Thanks for all the insight everyone. I am from Bangkok, we also lane splitting.

My commute route the past 4 years, Albany to SFSU, or 880 down to Newark. I lane splits when I feel safe, not much when overall traffic above 55-60.

I honk and flash my light, nicely, to make my way thru. I did got some angry drivers honk or flash their light back, but hey, they saw me, but not for long.
I got big light with amber lens, it help to be seen. At night even better, cars moved when they see the light.

I tried to keep the speed down, like other said, low delta. It also annoying to have loud bike flashed by when you in the car. We all drive too.

Have a good etiquette for anything, including lane splitting, be nice, be kind to people that stuck in the cars.

Stay calm, rushing is a recipe for disaster. learn meditation, learn about the awareness, lane splitting is not walk in the park. You gotta be on point.

Become like water.. as Bruce Lee said, read the traffic and be part of it.


Namaste.. rip rider.
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