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Old 08-31-2017, 10:50 AM   #1
itisagoodname
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Freeway Close Call

I had passed a serious MC collision incident less than a mile prior then this happens.

Always be 150% attentive and aware. There is absolutely no time for distractions, be aware of everything around you all the time.

Looks like the car came from lane 3 and passed through to lane 1. Yes there was contact, no he did not stop.

Some serious learning here...

Off the top of my head:

... both hands on the bars at all time (would have gained some reaction time)
... keep to center of the lane when not splitting (would have gained some extra distance)


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Old 08-31-2017, 10:57 AM   #2
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Some serious learning here...

Off the top of my head:

... both hands on the bars at all time (would have gained some reaction time)
... keep to center of the lane when not splitting (would have gained some extra distance)
You would have had more time and space to react had you been riding in the leftmost side of the lane.

Also consider that your speed (differential) was very high, especially considering your lane position.

I agree with you that keeping both hands on the bars is essential in areas of high risk.

EDIT: I just watched your ride to work video. Your speed delta is off the chart! Combine that with your choice to ride past huge gaps in traffic while choosing a position close to the vehicles you are passing (frequently remaining in the same lane as the cars you are passing), I'm quite shocked that you haven't had more close calls similar to the one in the posted video. It appears that you are betting on the cars to do the right thing.

Crash Analysis: Slow down a lot, create more distance between you and traffic you are passing (in the gaps), and stop splitting past Semis/box trucks. If a mistake is made as you split past them, you're going under them. Not much chance of survival when that happens. While injury is likely near cars, we're much less likely to go underneath them and get crushed to death.
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Old 08-31-2017, 12:03 PM   #3
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Couple thoughts: lane position + delta is HUGE. There's a big gap in front of you, PLUS a van (that cars can't see behind if they're looking in their mirrors). Cars are going to try to jump into that gap if they think there's one there.

In those instances, if your lane is moving along that quickly, I'd typically leave that gap and move over to the left side of my lane as far as needed to see quite a ways ahead - that gives me more reaction time to get out of the way of a lane jumper.

One lane moving along that much faster and being behind a big/wide vehicle I see as one of the most dangerous places to be in on a freeway...

Glad there was nothing more!
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Old 08-31-2017, 02:58 PM   #4
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I encounter this fairly regularly commuting. Speed delta and traffic gaps are the highest risk situations, and people always seem to be more hostile on the ride home.

This certainly could have been much worse, and certainly much safer as well.

My other question is the complete lack of braking. I find that if i have a potential escape path, i have a much quicker response and am less likely to mix up braking and swerving.

Here is a case where i certainly could not have stopped in time (note the motorcycles that pass directly behind me as well), and the added braking would have put me in direct contact with the rear fender instead of brushing the front fender.
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Old 08-31-2017, 03:15 PM   #5
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I encounter this fairly regularly commuting.
My somewhat sarcastic response is: And you haven't slowed and created more space yet?

More to the point: A lack of a crash doesn't necessarily mean that the tactics are correct, it could just be luck.

I propose that this incident is a warning to you. What are you going to do to reduce the chances of experiencing this again in the future?

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My other question is the complete lack of braking. I find that if i have a potential escape path, i have a much quicker response and am less likely to mix up braking and swerving.

Here is a case where i certainly could not have stopped in time (note the motorcycles that pass directly behind me as well), and the added braking would have put me in direct contact with the rear fender instead of brushing the front fender.
Obviously the choice to swerve was the right choice this time. Many people do brake first or together with a handlebar input. It's difficult / impossible to have the right answer for every situation.

But again...speed (slower) and space (more) would have given you a better chance. A co-worker of mine had a similar experience, but he almost bled out on the scene, and ended up loosing his leg.
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Old 08-31-2017, 03:58 PM   #6
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Wow, very lucky with that one, glad it wasn't worse. But from the looks of the video, you were going WAY too fast. What was your speed delta?
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Old 08-31-2017, 04:19 PM   #7
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65 right next to almost stationary traffic.
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Old 08-31-2017, 04:36 PM   #8
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65 right next to almost stationary traffic.
this. that delta is insane. The rider needs to understand the stopping abilities of his bike don't warrant that kind of speed.

Last edited by kelsodeez; 08-31-2017 at 05:49 PM..
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Old 09-01-2017, 06:39 AM   #9
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Some serious learning here...
Has anybody mentioned your insane speed delta and are you actually learning to lower it?
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Old 09-01-2017, 06:54 AM   #10
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Should a rider be splitting lane 2 and 3 in this scenario if he doesn't want to hold up people wanting to go 65 mph on the HOV lane if he himself is only trying to maintain 10 mph delta?
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:25 AM   #11
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The rider is in the HOV lane. Are you guys suggesting that if the traffic is stopped in the #2 lane, he should go 10 mph? Speed delta is usually associated with lane sharing. That is not the case here.
I think in this situation, lane position and keeping your head on a swivel is more important then keeping your delta down.
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Old 09-01-2017, 07:43 AM   #12
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I think in this situation, lane position and keeping your head on a swivel is more important then keeping your delta down.
Disagree. Your speed delta is absolutely critical and you should never sacrifice it for someone else's convenience. A high delta in this situation is not safe even for a car. Cars shouldn't be going 65mph next to a stopped lane either.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:17 AM   #13
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i dont even travel that fast in the HOV lane in a car when the lane next to it is semi stationary... people jump lanes all the time

drop 20 or 30mph from your delta and move waaaaay left of lane
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:36 AM   #14
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I ride the left of the HOV lane in this circumstance, as far left as I can go. Often literally riding the painted line (it's dry!) to give me extra forward vision and to be as far from the desperate lane dash as possible.
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Old 09-01-2017, 08:57 AM   #15
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Having learned my lesson(s) with high deltas, I seriously hope you've learned yours. Give yourself time to react, both with your lane position and speed. Even in a car in this situation I would be going much, much slower with full attention given to this exact possibility.
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