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Old 01-02-2019, 10:48 AM   #31
thedub
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I feel bad about my part in the derailment of this thread into an air filter maintenance argument when all OP wanted was a few questions answered.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:49 AM   #32
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I feel bad about my part in the derailment of this thread into an air filter maintenance argument when all OP wanted was a few questions answered.
That's BARF baby

All good info - appreciate it guys
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Old 01-02-2019, 11:01 AM   #33
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Best piece of advise in this thread was to go out and sign up for a day or weekend class. They are REALLY affordable for dirt. Previous motorcycle experience and even mountain biking doesnt always correlate. Bad skills or habits are harder to unlearn than proper skills and techniques the first time.

A class will also allow you to get on a bike without having to buy a beginner trail bike you "might" outgrow. Dont discount bikes like the CRF150F or CFR230F depending on your size. Lots of folks will tell you that you will quickly out grow them. I'll tell you from many years of experience that a lot of folks dont, and others simply dont learn proper technique or gain the confidence they need to progress when jumping on a two stroke MX bike or other high powered bike. Some can do it, many others cant.

I helped a rider who was transitioning to dirt with a track background struggle for many wknds on a YZ250 two stroke. One day on a CRF230F and he made more progress than all those previous wknds on the YZ. I'm not saying its a rule or folks havent been able to do so, but more often than not folks progress faster on low HP trail bikes. You just dont know.

These bikes also hold there value. Ride one for 6 months or a year and you will almost always get your money back or more even.

So learning from a pro will give a base of proper technique on a bike easy to learn on without having to make an investment in such a bike. Will give you insight into who you are and how fast you will pick up dirt riding. A WR250F, CR250X or even a two stroke might be appropriate after or you might find you enjoy and want more time on a CRF230F. Win win.

A pro will also help you weed through the noise and crap. There is already some conflicting and I would go so far as flat out wrong advise regarding bikes, maintenance, and riding technique right here in this thread. Not surprising, its the internet.

Keep a fresh clean filter that is well oiled and generously greased on the rim to ensure a long lasting motor. I use skins in Baja where I dont have an option to clean a filter daily, but thats the only place for them IMO. And your front brake is still your primary stopping power even on loose very steep descents. You arent going to stop using a rear brake alone.... and need to learn to modulate both brakes in such conditions.

Take a class and then hook up with some of us. Lots of folks with a lot of experience to help you out. You never truly master dirtbikes, but keep learning for a lifetime. And thats the beauty and enjoyment of it!

Just my opinion and experience, others may vary.
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Old 01-02-2019, 12:45 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by OaklandF4i View Post
Best piece of advise in this thread was to go out and sign up for a day or weekend class. They are REALLY affordable for dirt. Previous motorcycle experience and even mountain biking doesnt always correlate. Bad skills or habits are harder to unlearn than proper skills and techniques the first time.

A class will also allow you to get on a bike without having to buy a beginner trail bike you "might" outgrow. Dont discount bikes like the CRF150F or CFR230F depending on your size. Lots of folks will tell you that you will quickly out grow them. I'll tell you from many years of experience that a lot of folks dont, and others simply dont learn proper technique or gain the confidence they need to progress when jumping on a two stroke MX bike or other high powered bike. Some can do it, many others cant.

I helped a rider who was transitioning to dirt with a track background struggle for many wknds on a YZ250 two stroke. One day on a CRF230F and he made more progress than all those previous wknds on the YZ. I'm not saying its a rule or folks havent been able to do so, but more often than not folks progress faster on low HP trail bikes. You just dont know.

These bikes also hold there value. Ride one for 6 months or a year and you will almost always get your money back or more even.

So learning from a pro will give a base of proper technique on a bike easy to learn on without having to make an investment in such a bike. Will give you insight into who you are and how fast you will pick up dirt riding. A WR250F, CR250X or even a two stroke might be appropriate after or you might find you enjoy and want more time on a CRF230F. Win win.

A pro will also help you weed through the noise and crap. There is already some conflicting and I would go so far as flat out wrong advise regarding bikes, maintenance, and riding technique right here in this thread. Not surprising, its the internet.

Keep a fresh clean filter that is well oiled and generously greased on the rim to ensure a long lasting motor. I use skins in Baja where I dont have an option to clean a filter daily, but thats the only place for them IMO. And your front brake is still your primary stopping power even on loose very steep descents. You arent going to stop using a rear brake alone.... and need to learn to modulate both brakes in such conditions.

Take a class and then hook up with some of us. Lots of folks with a lot of experience to help you out. You never truly master dirtbikes, but keep learning for a lifetime. And thats the beauty and enjoyment of it!

Just my opinion and experience, others may vary.
This makes total sense. My street experience - i rode an FZ09 for 2 years after having an SV650 as a first bike. I learned a lot - did some track time but back east where roads are not as technical - i felt like i needed more power - so i bought a Tuono. Fast forward 5 months - i move to the bay and i realize that my Tuono was a pretty dumb purchase. So much power - sluggish turn in - i missed having a more nimble bike.

I "downgraded" to a 14 street triple r and saw huge improvements at the track and riding in general. I bought the 18 RS 765 mid last year and seeing even more improvement.

I dont need to be sold that smaller displacement bikes are better for many reasons - i lived that case study through and through on the street.

I'm a 215lb rider with gear on - so i suppose what i'm looking to avoid is getting on something like a Ninja 300 but also avoiding getting something like a Tuono (or as some "helpful" people have suggested a CR500 ).

Sounds like a 2-stroke may be a bit much to handle and something like a WR250 is better?

Either way - i'll be looking to take the intro dirt course (my wife actually wants to take it too - she has her moto liscense but never ended up getting a bike - i feel way better with her starting out in dirt too) - so this is an easy win on many fronts to do this first.
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Old 01-02-2019, 01:00 PM   #35
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+1 on the crf230F or 150f, even 10+ years old
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Old 01-02-2019, 04:52 PM   #36
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Really depends on the two stroke. Ones set up and tuned for MX can be a handful on the trails, especially for a newer rider. They take their own set of skills, some might say more than a four stroke, and often lack e start unless you spend more money for a late model trail/offroad designed KTM/Husky 150/200/300 XC-W or TE. The Kawi KDX200/220 is a great two stroke trail bike for some one on a small budget and appreciates the smokers, but lacks estart.

E start is really nice for a new rider (experienced ones too) as you will be stalling the bike a lot when you start to tackle harder trails or obstacles. Just takes the frustration out of a situation where you are usually breathing very hard clinging to the side of a hill.

Some of us are die hard two stroke guys. Most of our riding group is, or have come back to two strokes. I ride a YZ250 kick only two stroke offroad. But it takes a significant investment to tune such a bike for offroad and the suspension. Which brings up the last point.

If you are riding offroad, you want offroad suspension, not an MX bike suspension. BIG difference and why you see so many models from different companies designed for offroad vs MX specifically. The valving is different and generally more supple. Can you ride an MX bike offroad? Yes, many do. But a lot of folks spend $750-1000 getting our MX bikes valved/sprung/set up for offroad use. You can skip that expenditure and just buy a bike meant, designed, and valved for offroad like the WR250F or CRF250X.

Neither would be considered a 20 yr old ninja 250. You can learn on them and go race a harescramble or enduro on them.
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I'm looking for 1970 or older project like a CB350 or Triumph 650. Cheap and complete. PM me if you have something - will provide it a good home.

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Last edited by OaklandF4i; 01-02-2019 at 04:55 PM..
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Old 01-02-2019, 05:31 PM   #37
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^^^ super helpful thank you sir
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:39 PM   #38
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I should mention that one of my reasons of bringing this up it this is a place where you can try bikes from 125 - 450cc and see what suits you.
Correction....Brian works with smaller bikes...mostly klx140's and a few 230's...it keeps the tracks in good shape and safer to learn on. The smaller bikes are a blast to ride though.
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Old 01-02-2019, 06:54 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post
This makes total sense. My street experience - i rode an FZ09 for 2 years after having an SV650 as a first bike. I learned a lot - did some track time but back east where roads are not as technical - i felt like i needed more power - so i bought a Tuono. Fast forward 5 months - i move to the bay and i realize that my Tuono was a pretty dumb purchase. So much power - sluggish turn in - i missed having a more nimble bike.

I "downgraded" to a 14 street triple r and saw huge improvements at the track and riding in general. I bought the 18 RS 765 mid last year and seeing even more improvement.

I dont need to be sold that smaller displacement bikes are better for many reasons - i lived that case study through and through on the street.

I'm a 215lb rider with gear on - so i suppose what i'm looking to avoid is getting on something like a Ninja 300 but also avoiding getting something like a Tuono (or as some "helpful" people have suggested a CR500 ).

Sounds like a 2-stroke may be a bit much to handle and something like a WR250 is better?

Either way - i'll be looking to take the intro dirt course (my wife actually wants to take it too - she has her moto liscense but never ended up getting a bike - i feel way better with her starting out in dirt too) - so this is an easy win on many fronts to do this first.
I raced DH for several years as well. You won't have much trouble transitioning to dirt bikes...they're very similar...just no pedals!
I have to agree the wr250f would be an awesome starter bike and one you could enjoy riding even after developing more skills.
Brian Bartlow's school would be a great intro for you and your wife...check out the website...feelikeaprodirt.com
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Old 01-02-2019, 07:46 PM   #40
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But it takes a significant investment to tune such a bike for offroad and the suspension.

That's all the investment you need to turn clickers, built-in-tuning.

Quote:
If you are riding offroad, you want offroad suspension, not an MX bike suspension. BIG difference and why you see so many models from different companies designed for offroad vs MX specifically. The valving is different and generally more supple. Can you ride an MX bike offroad? Yes, many do. But a lot of folks spend $750-1000 getting our MX bikes valved/sprung/set up for offroad use. You can skip that expenditure and just buy a bike meant, designed, and valved for offroad like the WR250F or CRF250X.
I'm still riding on stock MX suspension. Hell, I put MX bike forks on my "off-road" motorcycle and they are much, much better. Just yesterday I watched a video where some guy put KYB forks on his $11,000 "off-road" Husqvarna.

Throwing big dollars at suspension might be a waste for a noob coming from street bikes who is sure to learn quickly and have changing needs.
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Old 01-02-2019, 10:37 PM   #41
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Iím surprised after reading off road was mountain bike experience that no one mentioned getting some training/coaching. And we are lucky to have a great facility here in nor cal in Kelseyville called ďFeel like a Pro - DirtĒ (yep sameish as the track guys, former owner). Anyway besides bargain days they supply ALL gear and bikes of various cc along with coaching and tips. Several tracks making it the largest dirt facility in the country.

I have no affiliation other than living close and knowing about it. Iím going this spring.
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Brian is a fantastic coach/teacher. I guarantee you will learn and have a great time!
http://www.feellikeaprodirt.com
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