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Old 06-11-2018, 07:09 AM   #16
Chachi_Monster
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great stuff!
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Old 06-12-2018, 09:41 AM   #17
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Right turns are great IF you can see past the turn. Seems like most twisties are associated with hilly terrain so there's usually a cliff in the way.

My habit in left turns (extension of Late Entry Late Apex) is to hug the outside of the turn until I can get a clear view of the exit. Not so far as to get into the inevitable dirt and gravel out there, but as close as I dare. I can think of twice I've done this to encounter, smack dab in the middle of the turn, a large oncoming vehicle at least 1/2 way into my lane (one was a logging truck, one was a tour bus). Terrifying, and validating.

I shudder every time I see a sporty rider flying thru a left turn leaned over so that his/her helmet is inches from the DY or center line. Makes me think of Tee Ball.
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Old 06-12-2018, 11:31 AM   #18
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I came across this very enlightening article on quick-steering vs. trail-braking. They’re illustrated as track techniques but very applicable for backroad riding too. I use one or the other technique based on the situation, but before reading this article I didn't realize the two techniques were at odds. The key message is to be adaptable to the needs of each turn.

https://lifeatlean.com/quick-steering-vs-trail-braking/
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Old 06-19-2018, 07:47 AM   #19
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Try the Vanishing Point technique for reading blind turns. The link is to a BARF post I wrote 10 years ago, but it's timeless. ...
I personally think this technique should be taught in basic rider courses. Experienced or newbie it's good to know particularly for new roads.
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Old 06-19-2018, 06:19 PM   #20
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I personally think this technique should be taught in basic rider courses. Experienced or newbie it's good to know particularly for new roads.
We teach, what I think is a better version of that: stay outside until you can see the exit of the turn, then turn in and accelerate. This is taught in a couple different parts of the course.
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Old 06-20-2018, 09:38 AM   #21
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We teach, what I think is a better version of that: stay outside until you can see the exit of the turn, then turn in and accelerate. This is taught in a couple different parts of the course.
The vanishing point idea takes all conditions into account not just cornering.

Small hills on straights being just one example.

I've been behind cars passing a bicycle that think nothing about placing their car in the other lane with a "blind" hill coming up.
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Old 07-15-2018, 01:06 PM   #22
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Keep in mind that sand/gravel builds up in the center of the lane due to vehicle tracks. When going into blind turns I usually pick the line that a cars left tires would be tracking.
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Old 07-15-2018, 01:52 PM   #23
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If you see ONE deer, there's likely some more around that next corner.
Same with LEO's.
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