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Old 09-04-2020, 12:23 PM   #1
cozy
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Rear brakes squeal loud immediately after new brake pads installed.

So I paid a motorcycle shop ( I've been to a few times so far for other work done ) to replace the rear brake pads & whatever else needed to have fully functioning rear brakes. I was going to do it myself, started to but once I got old pads off and started installing new pads discovered they wouldn't stay in partly due to old work out retaining metal wire pieces and my lack of understanding likely. So i had them do it after ordering new parts additional to brake pads, which they said were needing replaced also to keep new pads in.

Seems the moto shop has a very new mechanic do the brakes as he kept asking the older mechanic for advice on how to do the work.

Needed new metal backing brackets as well which I ordered through them and they included in install of new rear brake pads. One of their mechanics had replaced my front brake pads just a few months earlier and he ( and another mechanic who looked at rear brakes and rotor ) said both rotors look in good condition so no need to replace rotors.

There was a tiny bit of scratching when applying rear brake, but no major squealing or screeching. And there was a small amount of pad left when replaced.

However immediately after they replaced my rear brakes, most of the time when I apply rear brakss know they screech horribly. To point so loud I tend to not even want to use the rear brakes.

Which would suggest they were installed incorrectly? When I called the shop back they said it could be the rear rotor needs replaced. But that makes no sense after being told just before the rotors are fine and the loud screeching noise only began immediately after they replaced rear brakes.

Suggestions?

Last edited by cozy; 09-04-2020 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 09-04-2020, 02:20 PM   #2
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If everything was done properly, then give them some time to wear into the existing grooves on the rotor.

Same brand and model as the old pads?
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Old 09-04-2020, 02:51 PM   #3
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There is a chrome color metal piece shaped to fit the contour of the brake caliper housing. It could be that that piece is installed cockeyed. If so, the brake would still work but it makes noise when the caliper pistons engage because the piece is askew.
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Old 09-05-2020, 12:26 PM   #4
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At a minimum new pads require a grove free disc to complete the job 100%...
either erase the grooves or replace the disc because new pads and old grooves
is a brake job only 50% completed...

Disc Sanding
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Old 09-05-2020, 02:55 PM   #5
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The front brake squeaked for ten years on my XR650L at slower speeds. I have two different front wheels and it did it on both.

When the pads were finally worn down enough I ordered a new set of Galfer pads - whatever was recommended for the bike - and then used some emery cloth for the pads and the rotor. I scuffed up everything well and now I get no sound at all from the front brake. I should have done that years ago. I'll have to scuff up the rotor on the other wheel before I put it on the bike.

Sometimes the pad material is more likely to squeal and sometimes there is glazing on the rotor. In my experience, usually it's the pad material that makes the biggest difference. That's what finally cured it for the rear brake of my 1997 Ducati Monster.
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Old 09-05-2020, 03:20 PM   #6
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Brake squeal can be nothing more than pad material, or old pad material on the rotors. It can also come from contamination (unlikely on new pads), dust, or even the metal backing of the pad (put anti squeal brake compound on for the latter.)

Can also be caused by the or a sharp edge of the pad just lightly touching the rotor. This is pretty common with models and pad material, put a chamfer on both edges of the pad... its usually the leading edge. Some circle 8's on flat concrete will be enough to put one on a pad, no special tools required.

Had to do this on my Daytona 675 and few other bikes over the years. Its so common on some model vehicles, like my Land Rover, that the pads actually come with a chamfer already on the pads from the factory.

Good luck, squeals are generally not dangerous with new pads, but annoying as F#%#+.
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Old 09-08-2020, 11:01 PM   #7
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Thanks. Today when I rode it there seems to be less squeaking than before. I did ask that they put some grease when installing new pads as one of the videos I saw about installing new pads suggested also. But the shop mechanics brushed it off saying it's not needed.
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Old 09-09-2020, 07:41 AM   #8
Tom G
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Careful if you put grease on your brakes. It can get liquid when it gets hot. You may be unable to stop one day
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Old 09-09-2020, 10:49 AM   #9
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One doesn't use grease, or at least shouldn't for the reason you mentioned. However, there are specific "greases" that can be used. I use this on my Mini brake pads:

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/p...yABEgJyGvD_BwE

It doesn't help with the squealing much, though, as I'm running a track compound on the street and squealing is expected. But it seems to help a little.

I'm betting that after some more use, your pads will quiet down.
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Old 09-09-2020, 12:59 PM   #10
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The last squealing brake pads I had, only went away when I replaced the pad. The pads were mid level quality, and no amount of sanding or beveling or cleaning the disc made much difference. Replaced with EBC HH pads, and squeal went away immediatly.
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Old 09-10-2020, 09:15 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
Thanks. Today when I rode it there seems to be less squeaking than before. I did ask that they put some grease when installing new pads as one of the videos I saw about installing new pads suggested also. But the shop mechanics brushed it off saying it's not needed.
If you saw the same video I'm thinking of, it's a really bad idea. You'll see in the comment section of that video that grease/lube is not needed at all as friction is the main job of a brake.
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Old 09-10-2020, 09:32 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
Thanks. Today when I rode it there seems to be less squeaking than before. I did ask that they put some grease when installing new pads as one of the videos I saw about installing new pads suggested also. But the shop mechanics brushed it off saying it's not needed.
This is why your brakes squeak. It’s caused by slip-stick motion between the back of the pad (steel part) and the piston. The way to solve it is to decrease friction at that interface. There is a specific grease made for this application. Search “brake caliper grease.” Apply it sparingly to the pistons (you have to remove the pads first). You just need a thin layer of grease on the pistons, then reinstall your pads. It will not spooge out and contaminate your friction material if you are careful.
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Old 09-10-2020, 10:13 AM   #13
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See the link in my post above.
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Old 09-20-2020, 04:34 AM   #14
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Normally as new Pads settle it causes a low volume scraping sound. Even worn Rotors have the same low volume scrape sound. Note it doesn't matter the rotor condition the sound is low volume.
Loud sounds indicate metal to metal scraping. With new brake pad it has to be incorrectly installed parts. There is metal shims, retaining springs and even a rotor not sandwiched properly between the pads.
Call the Shop and have it corrected. Don't have the rotor changed it is not the current problem.
If the Bike has 50k miles on it. Next time the Rear Tire is changed. Have them put a new Rotor installed.
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Old 09-20-2020, 04:56 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Free_Bird View Post
Normally as new Pads settle it causes a low volume scraping sound. Even worn Rotors have the same low volume scrape sound. Note it doesn't matter the rotor condition the sound is low volume.
Loud sounds indicate metal to metal scraping.
This doesn't match up at all with my experience, at least when it comes to brake squeal.
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