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Old 03-17-2017, 08:26 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
I have recently reorganized my copy of the SWITRS database thru 2015 to more easily summarize moto-related stuff. If there's something specific you're interested in, I may be able to post a table or graph I already have or can produce quickly.

For info, here are a few of the data elements collected for every crash: date, time, location (city, county, road, milepoint, sometimes lat/lon), weather, crash severity (from fatal to non-injury), who was at fault, primary collision factor, type of collision (head-on, rear-end, etc.), types of vehicles involved. For each vehicle: driver age, sex, drug/alcohol use, injury severity, helmet, movement before crash, other contributing factors. There's not much about the motorcycle itself other than make.

Anything there you'd like to see?
For "rear-end" collisions, are you able to parse among 1) motorcycle rear-ended (motorcycle hit from behind), 2) motorcycle rear-ender (moto hit another vehicle's rear), and between a) lane splitting and b) not splitting?

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Old 03-17-2017, 07:02 PM   #47
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Originally Posted by glooey View Post
For "rear-end" collisions, are you able to parse among 1) motorcycle rear-ended (motorcycle hit from behind), 2) motorcycle rear-ender (moto hit another vehicle's rear), and between a) lane splitting and b) not splitting?

Thanks.
In fatal crashes, the US DOT database reports clearly which vehicle did what in a rear-end crash. In California fatal 2-vehicle rear-end crashes 2011-2015, the motorcycle struck the other vehicle from behind in 82% of cases. For the US (including California) it was 64%.

But the 161 California fatals are just a small percentage of all rear-end crashes. On the CHP SWITRS database, there are more than 10,000 2-vehicle motorcycle rear-end crashes 2011-2015. In that data, it's less clear who did what to whom. "At fault" is reported, and the rider was at fault in 64% of those crashes. In most of those, I expect the motorcycle struck the other vehicle from behind, but there's also the possibility that the rider was at fault for a crap lane change that precipitated impact from behind.


Lane splitting is not reported in either the US DOT traffic fatality database or CHP's SWITRS.
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Old 03-18-2017, 07:40 AM   #48
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Thanks, DataDan.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:24 AM   #49
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2016 update

I've recently downloaded 2016 crash data from the CHP website. Here are summaries for California and the Bay Area (= 9 counties on the Bay + Santa Cruz):



crash data from http://iswitrs.chp.ca.gov/Reports/jsp/RawData.jsp



While crashes have increased post-recession, fatalities are below the 2008 highs both statewide and in the Bay.

So far in 2017, we have seen a lot of BARF RIP threads. From stories that have appeared in the news, 39 riders have died year to date, more than the database count for the same period in 2016 but about the same as 2015.
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Old 08-10-2017, 02:28 PM   #50
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This is fantastic, super interesting, and important info! Thank you for sharing!
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Old 08-10-2017, 04:25 PM   #51
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These recent graphs are totals, or per capita/per mile traveled, or some other "normalizing" statistic?
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Old 08-11-2017, 06:18 AM   #52
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These recent graphs are totals, or per capita/per mile traveled, or some other "normalizing" statistic?
An important suggestion.
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Old 08-13-2017, 08:48 AM   #53
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These recent graphs are totals, or per capita/per mile traveled, or some other "normalizing" statistic?
Numbers in the 2016 update are counts--around 17,000 police-reported motorcycle crashes in California in 2016.

Crash rate per vehicle-mile traveled is the best way to assess average motorcyclist risk IMHO, but motorcycle vehicle-mile estimates by state aren't very reliable. Motorcycle registrations, OTOH, are reliable but may not reflect actual riding. However, registrations is the best exposure measure available, and assuming riding habits don't change dramatically year-to-year, the rate can help spot short-term trends.

Here is a recent history of crashes, registrations, and crash rate per 1,000 registrations (2016 registrations are not yet available). I included Bay Area data in my 2016 Update post, but motorcycle registrations by county are no longer available, so I can't present the Bay Area rate.


crash data from http://iswitrs.chp.ca.gov/Reports/jsp/RawData.jsp
registrations from https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinfor...statistics.cfm



Another aspect of crash risk is lethality, the percentage of reported motorcycle crashes that result in rider death:


crash and fatality data from http://iswitrs.chp.ca.gov/Reports/jsp/RawData.jsp
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Last edited by DataDan; 08-13-2017 at 01:28 PM.. Reason: clarified graph units
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Old 02-10-2018, 09:06 AM   #54
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Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
Numbers in the 2016 update are counts--around 17,000 police-reported motorcycle crashes in California in 2016.

Crash rate per vehicle-mile traveled is the best way to assess average motorcyclist risk IMHO, but motorcycle vehicle-mile estimates by state aren't very reliable. Motorcycle registrations, OTOH, are reliable but may not reflect actual riding. However, registrations is the best exposure measure available, and assuming riding habits don't change dramatically year-to-year, the rate can help spot short-term trends.

Here is a recent history of crashes, registrations, and crash rate per 1,000 registrations (2016 registrations are not yet available). I included Bay Area data in my 2016 Update post, but motorcycle registrations by county are no longer available, so I can't present the Bay Area rate.


crash data from http://iswitrs.chp.ca.gov/Reports/jsp/RawData.jsp
registrations from https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policyinfor...statistics.cfm



Another aspect of crash risk is lethality, the percentage of reported motorcycle crashes that result in rider death:


crash and fatality data from http://iswitrs.chp.ca.gov/Reports/jsp/RawData.jsp


Thx for the summary DD.
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Old 03-18-2019, 11:47 AM   #55
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Q: I have witnessed on more than one occasion a motorcycle go down and the rider gets back on the bike and takes off (could be for many different reasons). In both instances there was no collision although that isn't to say one would not have happened or the reaction to an impending collision didn't result in the reaction that caused the single vehicle crash.

Does this happen enough to consider that there would be a meaningful affect to the stats? I recognize that the rider probably isn't calling it in, but do others?

If the Q is inappropriate for this thread, Op can say so, I'll zap it.
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Old 03-18-2019, 01:03 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Schnellbandit View Post
Q: I have witnessed on more than one occasion a motorcycle go down and the rider gets back on the bike and takes off (could be for many different reasons). In both instances there was no collision although that isn't to say one would not have happened or the reaction to an impending collision didn't result in the reaction that caused the single vehicle crash.

Does this happen enough to consider that there would be a meaningful affect to the stats? I recognize that the rider probably isn't calling it in, but do others?

If the Q is inappropriate for this thread, Op can say so, I'll zap it.
Good question, but I don't have a good answer.

It's happened to me a few times in the past 40 years. I'm not going to file a police report for a solo crash without good reason--damage to someone else's property, damage to the motorcycle I want insurance to cover, or injury to me.

While inclusion of incidents like that would increase crash counts, I don't think they would affect trends, since the unreported crash percentage probably doesn't change year-to-year.

Here are updated versions of the charts I posted in 2017:



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Old 03-18-2019, 01:51 PM   #57
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It's interesting to see that the number of crashes (adjusted for ridership) and rider lethality have remained relatively constant over the time frame presented. Although I don't have any data to hand, I would expect that a much larger percentage of bikes now have various rider aids (ABS, traction control etc.). If this were true, that would indicate that, despite the broader adoption of newer technologies to prevent crashes, this hasn't had much of an impact in the number of actual crashes or rider deaths. Is this a fair conclusion?
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:18 PM   #58
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It's interesting to see that the number of crashes (adjusted for ridership) and rider lethality have remained relatively constant over the time frame presented. Although I don't have any data to hand, I would expect that a much larger percentage of bikes now have various rider aids (ABS, traction control etc.). If this were true, that would indicate that, despite the broader adoption of newer technologies to prevent crashes, this hasn't had much of an impact in the number of actual crashes or rider deaths. Is this a fair conclusion?
The effect of ABS doesn't show up in data like this because ABS is still not very widely used, and the kinds of crashes it can prevent are not a large percentage of all crashes.

An NTSB analysis (PDF) of the as-yet unpublished Motorcycle Crash Causation Study found:
Non-ABS-equipped motorcycles had 2 times the crash risk relative to motorcycles that had this safety feature. The percentage of MCCS motorcycles that were equipped with ABS (11%) was consistent with that of all registered motorcycles with ABS as a standard or optional feature in the United States (12%) in 2015.
A 50% reduction in crash risk sounds like a lot. But that was for all crashes, not only those where ABS would help. So part of the observed benefit is due to the tendency of riders who buy ABS to be safer in other ways, too.

Hurt found slide-out or highside (presumably the result of initial lockup) in 24% of crashes. I looked at one year of NHTSA's Crash Report Sampling System and found that a skid occurred in 14% of crashes. Going with Hurt's result and the reported 12% presence of ABS, crashes would be reduced by less than 3%.
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Last edited by DataDan; 03-18-2019 at 07:55 PM..
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