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Old 12-31-2018, 01:54 PM   #1
Moto Beck
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Looking to get into dirt - what do i need to know?

For some background - I started on 2 wheels racing downhill mountain bikes for many years back east - i've been riding motorcycles on the street now for the better part of 6 years with some track time mixed in (slow-moderate intermediate laps).

I was contemplating getting a cheap track bike and blowing my money on track days but as much as i really like the track - i find it stressful and logistically a pain in the ass.

I really miss riding in the dirt and attribute a lot of "saves" that i've had on my motorcycle to my mountain bike experience (even though it is largely different - i felt like my body motions in times where i needed it came without thinking thanks to so many years getting tossed around on a downhill rig).

With that said - i'm looking to get a dirt bike for 2019 but i really have no idea where to start.

Bike - i'm not looking for anything crazy - i don't think i need a beginner bike but i wouldn't be looking to get a "liter" bike for dirt either. Are there middle class dirt bikes and if so - which models should i be looking at? (Budget between 3k-4k - is this reasonable? i understand i'm not getting something top notch for that price).

Maintenance - i think i have the essentials from doing maintenance on my street bike (oil change stuff, wrenches/sockets, etc) are there any dirt bike specific tools or maintenance requirements i should be looking for? I know things like valve checks happen much sooner on a dirt bike - are those easy to do yourself?

Gear - I'm an ATGATT kind of guy - i'm not saying that for any other reason just to say - i wear full leathers all the time on the street and i'd be looking to wear the same level of safety (if possible) in the dirt. What are the essentials to get here?

Helmet | Boots | Gloves | Chest protector? | riding pants and jersey?

Odd Questions:
1. what do you do for insurance - if anything?
2. (probably my dumbest question) how do you handle maintenance issues if you're out on the trail? I know it's highly subjective based on the issue but lets say the bike's not running - is your only hope to diagnose the issue and bring a tool role and hope you can get the bike started again otherwise you're walking it out? (i.e. there is no AAA for Carnegie right? )


any other good pieces of advice?
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Old 12-31-2018, 02:25 PM   #2
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I'd get the lowest hour and cleanest YZ/WR 250F I could afford, definitely favoring the stretching of budget over trying to save a few bucks. They're super friendly beginner bikes, but have plenty of room to pick up the pace when you want to.

Valves are always the thing with modern 4t's, but the general rule is, if the bike starts easily hot and cold, they should be good to go. I generally stay away from listing that say, "valves adjusted", or at the minimum I'd need to ask some questions. I use the common shipping techniques, if the garage/yard look like shit then the bike is probably shit, or if they can't answer basic questions about oil/filter/maintenance schedule it's because it's not on one. Stuff like that. You'll deal with the specifics as you go, not much to really prepare for until you have a bike, then it's oil/lube/filter type of items you can pickup at Cycle Gear.

Gear is tough. I'm budget'y, but also like good stuff, so I favor one or two year old flagship models on closeout. Rocky Mountain, Motorsport and eBay, is where I usually go for last year's stuff.

I don't have insurance, but you should look into it. Anything less than a couple/few hundred a year is a no-brainer, imo.

On the trail you bring the basics with you, tube change stuff, 8/10/12mm sockets or wrenches, vise grips, tow strap, tp, stuff like that. Haven't had to push a bike out yet *knocks on wood*. Developing a maintenance schedule and caring for the bike at home really decreases the odds of a breakdown on the trail.
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Old 12-31-2018, 02:49 PM   #3
Eric in Davis
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I bought my first dirt bike last year. Here's a few comments on my dirt beginner experience.

I wanted something that I wouldn't need to spend time repairing/fixing. I went for a 2015 YZ250F since that's the first year Yamaha had FI on the YZ250F. I wasn't sure how often I'd be able to ride and didn't want to have to worry about having to clean the carb before riding. I wound up riding every few weeks during the 2017-2018 red sticker season, and then put some Amsoil fuel stabilizer in it in June and it was fine sitting until September. I paid mid $4k for it with 50 hours on it at at the time. It was in really good condition - I bought it from a young man that took very good care of it.

The only downside to having the YZ250F is that it is kick-start only. When I had 0 experience I thought that would be fine. But my buddy (who also has a '15 YZ250F) does some hare scramble type races, and I can see that having electric start would make things a lot better for that type of racing. Also, when you're on steep hills/single track trails life would be a lot easier with a simple electric start vs expending a lot of energy having to muscle your bike around to kick-start it every time you stall/tip over.

I went for Alpinestars boots, something mid-range around $300 I think at Cycle Gear. Pants/jersey can be dirt cheap for CG Bilt brand, but I think you're better off just spending the extra money on a better brand. I went for Fox stuff and it was maybe $140 for jersey+pants vs cheaping out with Bilt for 30-50% less. Gloves aren't much, just get some good name brand ones that feel comfy for $30-40. Coming from road racing, all the gear is soooo much cheaper. You aren't getting flipped off your bike going 160mph so the tech in the gear isn't so important. The exception to that is a neck brace though. I figured spending $300'ish on an Atlas neck brace is cheaper than any medical bill/life altering crash involving neck/spine injury. Helmet? Probably similar pricing and advice to street gear - fit is most important, then buy something that has good build quality. Goggles? 100% is one of the big brands, I bought something from 100% that CG had in the store, it was ~ $40-60 I think. No complaints.

Maintenance? I'd recommend switching to/using Notoil https://notoil.com/ air filter vs conventional. It's a no brainer - you need to clean your air filter after every ride. Do you want to deal with kerosine and all that BS or something that can be safely/legally dumped on your front lawn?
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Old 12-31-2018, 03:04 PM   #4
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just cuz no one has yet. CR500 best beginner bike out there for dirt
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Old 12-31-2018, 03:48 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post
Bike - i'm not looking for anything crazy - i don't think i need a beginner bike but i wouldn't be looking to get a "liter" bike for dirt either. Are there middle class dirt bikes and if so - which models should i be looking at? (Budget between 3k-4k - is this reasonable? i understand i'm not getting something top notch for that price).
Good advice above on bikes from byke and Eric. Just get the cleanest/newest/lowest hour/mile 250 4-stroke you can afford. You really want electric start. You will waste so much energy throughout the day kicking over your bike every time you tip over. I would also go for a trail bike, like a WR, rather than a mx racer, like a YZ. It's gonna be a little easier to handle for a newb, especially when you get in a pickle, like stuck on a loose hill climb or something like that. But up to you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post
Maintenance - i think i have the essentials from doing maintenance on my street bike (oil change stuff, wrenches/sockets, etc) are there any dirt bike specific tools or maintenance requirements i should be looking for? I know things like valve checks happen much sooner on a dirt bike - are those easy to do yourself?
Pretty much just follow the maintenance schedule, just like your street bike. Although some things do come up a bit faster. Only thing that's really different is you need to clean the air filter after pretty much every dusty ride.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post
Gear - I'm an ATGATT kind of guy - i'm not saying that for any other reason just to say - i wear full leathers all the time on the street and i'd be looking to wear the same level of safety (if possible) in the dirt. What are the essentials to get here?

Helmet | Boots | Gloves | Chest protector? | riding pants and jersey?
In my opinion good boots are the most important piece of gear. The terrain is rocky and uneven, you are going to be putting your feet down a lot and tipping over. Top tier boots (A* Tech 10, Gaerne SG12, Sidi Crossfire 3) are really, really expensive. But your feet/ankles take a beating and these boots are your best chance to avoid injury. Skimp on other gear if you have to.
One thing not on your list is knee guards. Do not ride without knee guards.
Helmet, whatever, just get one that fits.
Dirt bike gloves are a joke. They are literally just fabric. With maybe a little knuckle impact protection on some models.
For upper body protection, you can either get a 'pressure suit' which is all the armor built into to a lightweight jacket. Or you can a separate back/chest protector and elbow guards. Don't skip the elbow guards, they will be hitting the ground.
Riding pants and jersey, whatever, just go on Rocky Mountain and find some closeout stuff.
Armored shorts aren't a bad idea when you are first starting out; your hips are gonna hit the ground a lot.
There is other stuff, like knee braces (instead of just guards) and neck braces that you can research and decide for yourself.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post
Odd Questions:
1. what do you do for insurance - if anything?
2. (probably my dumbest question) how do you handle maintenance issues if you're out on the trail? I know it's highly subjective based on the issue but lets say the bike's not running - is your only hope to diagnose the issue and bring a tool role and hope you can get the bike started again otherwise you're walking it out? (i.e. there is no AAA for Carnegie right? )
1. You can buy a policy just like you can for your street bike, insurance companies don't care that it's an OHV, they will still take your money. Or not. Whatever, up to you.

2. Yes, you are correct. Bring a kit of basic hand tools and other stuff like quicksteel/zip ties/gorilla tape. Also bring a tow strap as a last resort for an immobilized bike. Just a couple weeks ago a buddy I was riding with broke his chain; I towed him 14 miles out of the woods.
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Old 12-31-2018, 04:30 PM   #6
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Good advice above on bikes from byke and Eric. Just get the cleanest/newest/lowest hour/mile 250 4-stroke you can afford. You really want electric start. You will waste so much energy throughout the day kicking over your bike every time you tip over. I would also go for a trail bike, like a WR, rather than a mx racer, like a YZ. It's gonna be a little easier to handle for a newb, especially when you get in a pickle, like stuck on a loose hill climb or something like that. But up to you.
Yeah, as someone that bought a YZ 1 year ago, I kind of wish I had gone with a WR (MSRP is a bit more though).
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Old 12-31-2018, 04:30 PM   #7
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To add to the good advise that has already been offered... you might also consider an "enduro" (not to be confused with dual-sport) style bike. These are dirt-bikes specifically set up for trail riding. Think WR250, KDX200, KDX250, EXC300, etc. These usually tuned for more bottom to mid-range power than their MX cousins, have wide ration transmissions, 18 inch rear wheels (better over rough surfaces than 19 inch rear wheels on MX bikes) and some rudimentary lights (if you get caught on the trail after sunset). I'd consider a 2-stroke as they are lighter and less maintenance.

I personally ride an old WR250 and love it. Got it for cheap and have had almost no problems except for a fouled plug once. I'm always ready to ride while my buddies are often having issues with their expensive push-button start, fuel injected, fancy bikes.

Thats my $0.02
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Old 12-31-2018, 04:41 PM   #8
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^^^+1 to the KDX200/220 as a killer 2t option. They're getting a little harder to find, but you'd pretty much have no trouble scoring a reeeaaally nice one for $3k or less. I normally put condition very close to the top of the list, right there with make/model. Nothing worse for a new dirt rider than the frustration that comes with trying to sort out a neglected dirt bike. So, I'd always take a known good KDX200/220 over an unknown anything else.
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Old 12-31-2018, 05:56 PM   #9
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You have the cash for a decent 4 stroke but for less you can have a decent 2-stroke. a Cr or YZ125 is you are not over 200 lbs or a 250 if you are.

They are LIGHTer about 215 lbs as compared to the 4 strokes at about 250lbs and that light weight makes a big difference.

You can add weights to the flywheel to smooth out the power and torque curves and make it much more manageable.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:33 PM   #10
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Few things to add ...
Have you heard of the green sticker & red sticker thing? Some odd rules. Most years (but not all) WR250F are green sticker, most YZ250F are red sticker. A green sticker can go to riding parks all year long. The red sticker bikes can't be ridden at certain places during summer months. Tons more info to check, but bottom line, I'd suggest a green sticker bike so you don't have to deal with the limitations with a red sticker.

Also agree the WR250F is an excellent target bike. Most are green sticker, most have electric start (but check, early models were kick start only, and bizarre that some years are red sticker).

For a two stroke, any 2002 or older bike should be a green sticker.

For maintenance ... air filter maintenance is probably the biggest difference. They are foam and you put a heavy air filter oil on them. If you ride around solo, or with people on a non dusty day, you can get several rides in. But most times around here it is dusty, and 1 day in dust can really clog it up. So plan to check it after each ride. I'm a bit of a nut, I buy the cheaper $10-$12 filters (some popular models are like $8) and just throw the filter away when it is dirty. Most guys go thru a routine to clean them. Not worth the $10 IMO.

For tires, I suggest keep really nice newish tires on your bike. Some guys thinks "still got knobs on there" and keep riding.

For tools to carry with you. If I am going to Carnegie or Metcaf or Hollister, I don't carry anything. Ahhhh! But I check my bike over very carefully in the garage before going. If I'm headed out to one of the further out more remote places, then I'll carry a few tools, spare spark plug & wrench, and my inreach SOS device.
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Old 12-31-2018, 08:56 PM   #11
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High-end boots, comfortable helmet with removable/washable liner, vest or backback, hydration system, vented pants. Heaviest tools on the bike, carry the rest.

Get a factory service manual. Special tools are needed for fork rebuilds and engine rebuilds. Dirt bikes are way easier to work on than street bikes. Some dirt bikes are easier to work on than others (ahem).

It's very rare for a bike to break down, and if it does, you're probably not going to fix it. Bring a tow strap. It's more likely that you break something in a crash or get a flat tire. Use flat-prevention (UHD tubes, Tubliss, or mousse). Crash-proof your bike with guards. In all the years I've been riding, the only common breakdown is flat tires.

You can get liability and comprehensive insurance cheap. I don't think collision would be wise unless you got a $12,000 dirt bike and only rode it to Starbucks.
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Old 12-31-2018, 09:25 PM   #12
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I carry spare tubes in my fenderpack. I carry a trail backpack that has tools, airpump, slime, water, and snacks.
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Old 12-31-2018, 10:02 PM   #13
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My advice: ride with dudes that carry spare tubes, etcetera. They love showing you how good they are at fixing shit.

Oh, and ride with BARFers.
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Old 01-01-2019, 09:14 AM   #14
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Something that hasn't been added yet: air filters! It is a good idea to have a couple (I have six) and change them after EVERY ride. Pick up a Twin Air cleaning and oiling kit and get that figured out. Also, be meticulous about using good gas, and keep an eye on your fuel filters. Oil changes are easy, and your fuel filter should be cleaned/changed at least as often as your oil. All the comments about gear are spot on, but also consider a high quality knee brace. Currently I am riding in the PODS braces and they are a big improvement over just wearing knee guards. I also wear a Leatt neck brace. I am also a mountain biker, you will love dirt biking!!

edit: I didn't see that "usedtobefast" also commented on air filters. I bought my KTM new, and here in Central Oregon it is dusty, and the dust is millions of years old volcanic ash. Not something you want in your engine. My plan is to keep my bike forever, that is why I follow a meticulous air filter maintenance program. I ride with a new filter until I am down to one (or none depending on when I am riding again) and then clean all six at once. With the Twin Air kit cleaning is pretty easy. If money were no object I'd buy cases of pre-oiled filters and just give the used filters away after a single use! But in my opinion, if you are riding until the air filter looks dirty, it has probably been on the bike for too long.

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Old 01-01-2019, 10:43 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moto Beck View Post

Bike - i'm not looking for anything crazy - i don't think i need a beginner bike but i wouldn't be looking to get a "liter" bike for dirt either. Are there middle class dirt bikes and if so - which models should i be looking at? (Budget between 3k-4k - is this reasonable? i understand i'm not getting something top notch for that price).

Maintenance - i think i have the essentials from doing maintenance on my street bike (oil change stuff, wrenches/sockets, etc) are there any dirt bike specific tools or maintenance requirements i should be looking for? I know things like valve checks happen much sooner on a dirt bike - are those easy to do yourself?

Gear - I'm an ATGATT kind of guy - i'm not saying that for any other reason just to say - i wear full leathers all the time on the street and i'd be looking to wear the same level of safety (if possible) in the dirt. What are the essentials to get here?

Helmet | Boots | Gloves | Chest protector? | riding pants and jersey?

Odd Questions:
1. what do you do for insurance - if anything?
2. (probably my dumbest question) how do you handle maintenance issues if you're out on the trail? I know it's highly subjective based on the issue but lets say the bike's not running - is your only hope to diagnose the issue and bring a tool role and hope you can get the bike started again otherwise you're walking it out? (i.e. there is no AAA for Carnegie right? )


any other good pieces of advice?
I've been riding street for close to 20 years and just got into dirt within the last 2-3 years. One of my few regrets in life is not getting into dirt riding sooner. It's sooooo much fun. That being said, here's my novice advice.

Bike
Like others here have said, get a good low hour 250. I started on an XT225 and very quickly reached it's limitations. I bumped up to a WR250F and love the bike. Way more capable than I am and I have yet to reach it's full potential. The WR/YZ are great bulletproof bikes and have been around for a long time and have a great track record. CRF's are great too, but have a reputation for needing headwork and aftermarket valves, so if you're looking for one, try and find one that's already had the work done recently. I've ridden a couple of 2 strokes and they're crazy fast, but I'm not a fan of riding them downhill. I prefer the engine braking of a 4 stroke. YMMV.

Maintenance
Dirt bikes are pretty easy. I do the oil and oil filter every 2nd ride. They don't take a lot of oil and filters are pretty cheap. I use a BMC filter and clean it after every ride. Buy a pressure washer from Harbor Freight, it'll make cleaning the bike super easy. Remember to lube the chain afterwards. Getting a lift stand like this, helps make maintenance much easier.

Gear
A helmet and boots are going to be your biggest expense. Good boots are pretty pricey. I lucked out and a friend gave me some low hour A-stars Tech 10's for free. Obviously you know the importance of buying a good helmet. Not much to add there. I invested some money in armor and bought a Fox Titan armor jacket. I've fallen in this thing a bunch and have never been hurt enough that I quit riding for the day. I've also got the Fox Titan knee guards. They fit well, don't move around a lot and provide some really great protection. I also wear Fox MX socks. The foot sock part is nice and padded and comfortable, while the mid-thigh under armor like material helps keep you cool and the knee pads from chafing. Helps make long rides more comfortable. Pants and jersey, I buy what's on sale and fits well. I find they tend to last a season, so I don't invest a whole lot of money there. Also, how do you plan on getting your bike from home to park? I got some trackside ramps and load the bike into the bed of my F150. It's kind of a pain in the ass though and I ended up getting a hitch carrier like this. Also get some good tie-down straps. I really like these Pro-taper straps. The hitch carrier makes loading and unloading the bike a lot less stressful.
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