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Old 04-23-2018, 02:13 PM   #76
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FYI... the CHP tips are very close.

They changed the wording from Guidelines to Tips.
They also took out all speed references and just said as speeds increase so does the danger.

I expect they will be out by May 1.
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Old 04-23-2018, 02:24 PM   #77
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FYI... the CHP tips are very close.

They changed the wording from Guidelines to Tips.
They also took out all speed references and just said as speeds increase so does the danger.

I expect they will be out by May 1.
Very nice work.
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Old 07-09-2018, 05:46 PM   #78
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Not mentioned in the BARF Guidelines is the potential danger of "splitting" on a single-lane ramp. In San Diego yesterday, a rider was passing vehicles on a wide, single-lane freeway offramp (Google Maps link). However, approaching the stop sign at the end of the ramp, the one wide lane becomes two narrow lanes. While the motorcyclist was apparently passing on the left, a vehicle ahead veered left into the left-turn lane, forcing him into the curb. He died in the crash.

In similar crash a few years ago, a rider with passenger was using the wide right shoulder to pass a truck on this single-lane ramp (Google Maps link). But as the curving ramp merges with another ramp, the rider's right shoulder disappeared, and the motorcycle went down under the truck, killing both occupants.

IANAL and take no position on the legality of "splitting" on a single-lane ramp. But if you do it, know the peril and have an escape route if it goes bad.
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Old 08-20-2018, 11:56 AM   #79
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A reminder... DON'T split near big rigs.

A friend of our family won't get the chance to see my reminder today.

Even the smallest of tip overs can turn fatal in a second.
Please be careful out there.
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:48 PM   #80
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What are the rules for an upcoming rider thats trying to pass during lane splitting?

I usually split really slow. Like 5-10mph (closer to five though) and when traffics moving 30+ I don’t split. So I’m sure this annoys a lot of riders behind me. I’m constantly checking mirrors to make sure I’m not in the way. But occasionally I’ll miss someone.

Example from last week. I was splitting pretty much stopped traffic so I’m on the slow end for speed. Another biker came up behind me and just keep reving his bike behind me. Keep in mind this is stopped traffic so I can’t really go anywhere. Eventually I got sick of it and just angled between two cars to get out of the way. He blew by and all was good.

This is my first year of splitting - I came from a state you just have to suffer in traffic. What do you guys do when you have an agressive rider come up behind you?

Hopefully replying here is okay. If not feel free to delete.
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:55 PM   #81
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Turning the question around, if you were splitting at 5 mph and came up behind a rider who was stopped in the split, what would you prefer he do?
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:49 AM   #82
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Turning the question around, if you were splitting at 5 mph and came up behind a rider who was stopped in the split, what would you prefer he do?
Honestly Iíd probably just wait. If it exceeded a minute or so I might give the rider a little honk to get moving.

But I get your point. I need to speed up when I split or stay out of the way.
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Old 12-03-2018, 12:22 PM   #83
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Honestly Iíd probably just wait. If it exceeded a minute or so I might give the rider a little honk to get moving.

But I get your point. I need to speed up when I split or stay out of the way.
I really don't think tzrider was recommending that you speed up.

FWIW, I think it is very sensible for you to limit your speed differential to 5-10mph. Stuff can happen, and until you've gained more experience, lower speeds will give you time to react to unanticipated incursions.

But other riders will be comfortable at higher speed, so you have to watch your six and get out of the way when a faster splitter comes along. There are exceptions, of course, but there will usually be a gap to move into so you won't hold up another rider very long.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:05 PM   #84
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What are the rules for an upcoming rider thats trying to pass during lane splitting?
Like anything in life, be courteous and let the faster rider pass when a safe opportunity presents itself. That said, the faster rider also needs to be courteous and not expect that you are able to instantly get out of their way. Don't let the other rider pressure you into taking action that you are uncomfortable with; provided you are not putting the other rider at greater risk, you should not be compromising your safety for the sake of their expediency.
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Old 12-03-2018, 01:51 PM   #85
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I think the proper protocol is acknowledge the rider and look for a gap to allow them by. If they are impatient beyond your safety shrug it off. They can find a way around.

Being aware is step one and stay safe is priority one.
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Old 12-03-2018, 03:01 PM   #86
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Budman and Cal Scott have it right. Look for a gap where you can safely give the other rider the split, and don't needlessly endanger yourself by speeding up past your comfort zone or diving into a bad situation from the split. It's courtesy, and safety has precedence over courtesy.

The other rider may be equally courteous, and is revbombing to ensure that you've noticed him. Or he may be a clown, and have unreasonable expectations. Ignore him, outside of the courtesy.
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Old 12-03-2018, 08:58 PM   #87
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I think the proper protocol is acknowledge the rider and look for a gap to allow them by. If they are impatient beyond your safety shrug it off. They can find a way around.

Being aware is step one and stay safe is priority one.
^ this. It is not your job to accommodate, at speed or slow splitting- unless you can do so safely and within your comfort level. There are plenty of other ways for them to get around, if they can't handle that- they got no business splitting. That said, keep a good lookout and scoot over earlier if its doable.
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Old 12-04-2018, 11:27 AM   #88
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Originally Posted by erok81 View Post
I usually split really slow. Like 5-10mph (closer to five though) and when traffics moving 30+ I donít split. So Iím sure this annoys a lot of riders behind me. Iím constantly checking mirrors to make sure Iím not in the way. But occasionally Iíll miss someone.


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Originally Posted by cal scott View Post
Like anything in life, be courteous and let the faster rider pass when a safe opportunity presents itself. That said, the faster rider also needs to be courteous and not expect that you are able to instantly get out of their way. Don't let the other rider pressure you into taking action that you are uncomfortable with; provided you are not putting the other rider at greater risk, you should not be compromising your safety for the sake of their expediency.
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I think the proper protocol is acknowledge the rider and look for a gap to allow them by. If they are impatient beyond your safety shrug it off. They can find a way around.

Being aware is step one and stay safe is priority one.
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Originally Posted by NorCalBusa View Post
^ this. It is not your job to accommodate, at speed or slow splitting- unless you can do so safely and within your comfort level. There are plenty of other ways for them to get around, if they can't handle that- they got no business splitting. That said, keep a good lookout and scoot over earlier if its doable.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:19 AM   #89
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Attention to these two items from the CHP Lanesplitting Tips...
  • Riding on the shoulder is illegal; it is not considered lane splitting.
  • Be visible -- Avoid remaining in the blind spots of other vehicles or lingering between vehicles.
...and this one under "More Risk" in the BARF Guidelines...
  • Intersections and crosswalks in the city.
...could have prevented a crash yesterday here (Google Maps link) in San Diego:



Stopped eastbound traffic (in the direction of the silver car) had opened a gap to allow a westbound driver to enter the driveway on the right. But an eastbound Harley rider using the bicycle lane passed the stopped traffic and hit the left-turning car. His injuries are not life-threatening.

That isn't what we normally think of as a "blind spot", but it is one--and it may be doubly blind. The driver about to enter your path can't see you, and you can't see the threatening vehicle.
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Old 12-14-2018, 08:43 AM   #90
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Stopped eastbound traffic (in the direction of the silver car) had opened a gap to allow a westbound driver to enter the driveway on the right. But an eastbound Harley rider using the bicycle lane passed the stopped traffic and hit the left-turning car. His injuries are not life-threatening.

That isn't what we normally think of as a "blind spot", but it is one--and it may be doubly blind. The driver about to enter your path can't see you, and you can't see the threatening vehicle.
"Blind spot" might not be the usual terminology for that, but it's a gap, and an obvious one, and should be treated as such. I'm not trying to be all victim blame-y, but riding in the bike lane into such a gap without serious caution is a double-dumb move. Gaps in stopped traffic don't happen for no reasonóthere could be obstacles that you can't see, a person could be walking through there, or a vehicle could be coming through, as in this case.

However, the link you posted doesn't say anything about the bike lane: "The motorcyclist, a 36-year-old man on a Harley Davidson, was heading eastbound in the right lane and was on the right of the stopped vehicles when the bike ran into the Lexus as the car was pulling into the business complex parking lot, Heims said."

Nor does this one, although that one has a note that it was modified. Maybe it was updated and that language removed. Busted tibia and fibula is no fun, though.

Same applies, of course, bike lane or notógaps are gaps, and gaps are dangerous.
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