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Old 03-03-2008, 06:25 AM   #16
scout
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ThinkFast View Post
Was just reading the latest crash post (rear wheel lockup, bike down in Moraga) and thought I'd add my $0.02 to this thread, on "common mistakes." I posted this in another thread - surprised no one reacted to it.

Based on an informal analysis of the posts in this topic (this is a crash analysis topic, right??) , I would submit that the vast majority of crashes people write about could be attributed to one of the following:

1. going too fast for the situation (even 15 mph can be too fast for some situations).
2. failure to look where you want to go (aka target fixation)
3. improper use of brakes (i.e., locked up the rear)
4. improper use of throttle
5. failure to anticipate

So while it is helpful to figure out why we crashed after it happens, I am a big fan of being proactive, and figuring out what I can do to reduce the chances of me crashing as much as possible. Ideally the result is I never find myself doing this post-crash analysis stuff, because I've paid attention to and worked on the skills that contribute to keeping it upright.

Therefore, the approach suggested when I posted this was to go to the track and learn how each one of these works for real, get past being a n00b on all of them, and then go practice them every time you ride on the street for the rest of your life. I personally think it's a good approach, or at least a place to start after you've taken your MSF BRC (or advanced for that matter).
Yes, wow, I just found this site and it's great to see some excellent riders. Your throttle point is accurate. Also, do street riders really use their rear brakes? I never did really in the dirt, unless messing around, and find myself rarely hitting the rear in the street, and can't remember if I did when in the street years ago. May be I'm riding the street wrong, I don't know, or just riding too slow, I guess.
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Old 03-23-2008, 02:29 PM   #17
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Thumbs up wrecking right...

Good points. After crashing myself I was lucky that I didnt go into head on like the guy (RIP) yesterday on 35. I did go off the road on arastradero heading toward old alpine. It was terrible, bike was trashed and I still have a open wound thats trying to heal from last july. I even went through a bit of barbed wire fence.

All way WAY WAY better than going head on. For me I was not good enough to consider recorecting after crossing the DY anyway. So I did decide to "lay it down" a very painfull and hard decision to make. It took lots of effort to physically lay the bike all the way over and down, but is something we should all be prepared to do everytime we ride. Bottom line even if you are that good its the road not the track and other people (cars/bikes) cant handle that level of riding/driving/reacting on the fly.

Peace and ride safe...
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Old 06-16-2008, 07:14 AM   #18
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Great post one thing that has always helped me is "slow is smooth and smooth is fast" slow it down in your mind and be smooth. panic is a sure way to loose control
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Old 06-16-2008, 09:15 AM   #19
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+1,000,000 Such a good post, definitely one all newbies and veteran riders should read! I will take this with my to June 30th! Thanks Berto.
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Old 07-02-2008, 10:44 AM   #20
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Great points to remember when riding, thanks for the insight.
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Old 07-02-2008, 10:46 AM   #21
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I will need to re-read this and re-new my no crash policy. Siiigh.
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Old 07-21-2008, 12:50 AM   #22
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First off, great post - I'm ecstatic I found this site and am very much looking forward to learning what I can here. Already learned a lot and I'm still on my first visit to the site.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scout View Post
Yes, wow, I just found this site and it's great to see some excellent riders. Your throttle point is accurate. Also, do street riders really use their rear brakes? I never did really in the dirt, unless messing around, and find myself rarely hitting the rear in the street, and can't remember if I did when in the street years ago. May be I'm riding the street wrong, I don't know, or just riding too slow, I guess.
Secondly - I'm months late on joining this conversation, but by scanning the replies, no one ever replied to the above question about using rear brakes... (if I missed it, my apologies). YES, street riders DO use rear brakes, if braking with correct technique, when traveling in a relatively straight line (no to little lean - but then ANY significant braking is a no-no when involved in any significant lean - only so much traction to go around). Your question begs a recommendation to take an MSF rider safety course for beginners - whether you've got years of riding under your belt or not - you (as I did, even though I'd been riding street for a few years before I finally took it) will learn things there that are not intuitive but are invaluable and even indispensible in keeping you alive and whole on a motorcycle. Other barfers will no doubt have much more experience and expertise to share than I, but from my experience and understanding, the rear brake used in tandem with the front is the most effective stopping technique, when used in proper proportion. 70+% of the braking power is in the front brakes due to the physics of a moving body (bike and rider); the other 30-% can only be aided by the rear brakes - that's why they're there! Trick is getting to know your bike, its brakes and having your rear brake pedal adjusted correctly so you can balance the front and rear braking properly to achieve maximum braking power without locking up the front or rear. Takes practice, but you can definitely stop in a shorter distance using both front and rear rather than just front. Worth taking the time to practice, too.
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Old 08-07-2008, 05:03 PM   #23
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Very helpful info! I was lucky to have heard the "Relax" part before i even started riding. That saved my ass once going through Daly City in the fog. I was taking an off-ramp and there were 3 sets of the slick reflective dots across the lanes going through the turn. Those are quite slippery when wet and i felt the back end slide as i rode across the first set, the front got squirly but i knew enough not to fight it. Sure enough the back slid out over each of the 3 sets but i was able to recover each time. VERY scary especially since i was inexperienced ad the time and it was an overpass with a 25' drop and no shoulder.
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Old 08-24-2008, 08:30 AM   #24
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excellent write up man. very educational
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Old 11-25-2008, 09:36 AM   #25
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Over time... I have put my mind in the right frame of mind before commencing my mountain rides.
Unlike the street where I totally pay attention to my surroundings and be on the defensive; I'll first leave my "EGO" at home, something you younger guns likely have a hard time doin, seriously! I've been there, done that.
It gets the better of you believe me.
Although It's a rush to ride aggresive as Shit, it's probably more difficult to ride smart, with discipline and with proper throttle control.
I feel great after riding a smart, brisk pace and evaluating the ride afterwards with a nice cold one or two.
It's those rides where you say to yourself, Holy Shit! I got lucky and entered that turn and others with mistakes.
That stuff catches up to you eventually as the first post implied.
Best,
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Old 02-27-2009, 01:04 PM   #26
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Thanks for the post! Lots of good info.
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Old 04-27-2009, 12:55 PM   #27
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Thank you for posting your wisdom. As a newbie I appreciate the advice of those who know so much more than I do about riding. :-)
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:07 PM   #28
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Awesome post! And avoiding dangerous objects is very true. One of my friends had a brother who laid his bike down and he hit a sign post which severed his leg. If he could have avoided that post he would have come out of it unharmed. As it was he lost his leg at 23.
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Old 05-10-2009, 12:56 PM   #29
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Quote:
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The best advice I ever got regarding blowing a turn, DY etc. was "You won't make the turn if you don't try to make the turn"(very Yoda like I guess) Many riders before you have made this turn faster than you are now preparing to blow it. If they could make it through, perhaps you can too. If you don't at least attempt it, your failure is guaranteed.
This is the mantra I have in my head as a new rider navigating the twistie stuff. I know for a fact that I'm NOWHERE near the full lean angle of my bike, so if I start to worry I'll overshoot a turn (for my own comfort level, not beacause I'm at the traction level of the bike at that point), I just have to calm down and push the bike further. I know this won't get me through every situation, but I think it's still good advice for someone who still has a bit of chicken strips on their tires.
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Old 08-11-2009, 03:33 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by scout View Post
Yes, wow, I just found this site and it's great to see some excellent riders. Your throttle point is accurate. Also, do street riders really use their rear brakes? I never did really in the dirt, unless messing around, and find myself rarely hitting the rear in the street, and can't remember if I did when in the street years ago. May be I'm riding the street wrong, I don't know, or just riding too slow, I guess.
*some* street riders use their rear brakes and tend to under use or skip the front brake because they never learned how to use it properly, resulting in long stops/high sides. Think big heavy cruisers rather than sport bikes, etc. Anyway, your dirt training should be very helpful to you on the street (just don't go backing it in going around corners at intersections in the city ).
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