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Old 06-17-2011, 10:19 AM   #1
DataDan
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The Right Start

Here at 1Rider one aim is to equip you with the knowledge you need to make choices that will help you get home safely from your next ride--and from every ride. If you're new to motorcycling, you have a lot to learn as you start out, and this thread will help you get off on the right foot with three essentials. We hope to show you how training can help prevent crashes, persuade you of the value of good safety gear, and help you understand the importance of choosing the right bike. Some riders learn these lessons the hard way--by crashing. The easy way is to learn from others' experiences, and many of those lessons can be found in crash research. Statistics aren't destiny, of course, but they can enlighten us about errors others have made.


The Right Skills

One startling finding from motorcycle crash studies is that many riders fail to take evasive any action to prevent the crash. In Harry Hurt's study of 900 crashes in Los Angeles County, 54% of riders failed to take the proper evasive action and 32% took no evasive action at all. MAIDS, a European study, found that 27% took no action and also discovered that untrained riders failed to take action 30% more often than trained riders. So an essential first step to acquiring the skill you need for safe riding is training in a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course available through most state training programs (including CMSP, the California Motorcyclist Safety Program), Harley Davidson Rider's Edge, and the armed services.

The effectiveness of skills taught by MSF was demonstrated in a CMSP study comparing the crash experiences of trained and untrained riders. Novices with no previous riding experience but with training crashed at a 24% lower rate per mile ridden than similarly inexperienced but untrained novices.

Just as remarkably, the CMSP study also found that trained riders rode 40% more miles in the year following training than untrained riders. This conclusion was similar for raw novices, more experienced novices who also took the basic rider course, and veterans who took the experienced rider course. The greater mileage suggests another benefit of training: it makes riding more fun. By helping you develop the skill to handle the motorcycle, training boosts confidence, so you get more out of riding. As MSF says: The more you know, the better it gets.

The Right Gear

While proper training prevents some crashes, others can still occur either because of extraordinary situations or simply due to rider error. That's not to say that crashing is inevitable. In 2009, nearly 8 million motorcycles were registered in the United States but only about 100,000 crashes were reported. So 7.9 million riders, more or less, made it through the year safely. But the injuries suffered in a motorcycle crash can be so severe that even a small chance of crashing is a good reason to protect yourself as well as possible.

The essential piece of safety gear for all riders is a helmet made to US Department of Transportation standards. The most compelling reason to wear a helmet is that it can save your life. No one claims that helmets are 100% effective, because not all fatal injuries are head injuries and not even a helmet can save your life in every head impact. But in a study of fatal crashes over 10 years, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, part of US DOT) concluded that 37% of unhelmeted riders who died in crashes would have lived if they had worn helmets.

Much more often than they save lives, helmets prevent less serious but potentially disabling injuries. MAIDS found that in 68% of crashes the helmet prevented or reduced head injury. And a US study found that 67% of unhelmeted motorcyclists who incurred brain injuries would not have suffered the injury had they worn helmets.

While a helmet is the one piece of gear that can save your life, protective clothing made for motorcycling--jacket, gloves, pants, and boots--can prevent or reduce many non-life-threatening injuries. MAIDS found that more than half of the injuries suffered by crash victims were to arms and legs. Protective gear usually can't prevent a fracture or amputation, but it can prevent or reduce painful and disfiguring lacerations, abrasions, and bruises.

The Right Bike

We have available today the most extraordinary motorcycles ever built for street riding. Current sportbikes are more capable than grand prix bikes of 20 years ago. The dark side of that capability is that sportbike riders are more likely to be killed than riders on other kinds of motorcycles. It's not the motorcycle's fault of course. Sportbikes turn and stop exceptionally well, so they're at least as capable of avoiding a crash as any other bike. But with enough horsepower to reach 100 miles an hour in 7 seconds and cover a quarter-mile from a standing start in 10 seconds, a sportbike can easily suck an inexperienced rider into trouble he can't get himself out of. One of the most important things a good rider learns is when and where not to use his bike's superlative capabilities.

Studies of sportbike crashes show that deaths are often the result of excessive speed. Across the US in 2006, 25% of motorcycle deaths were on sportbikes, yet they accounted for only 10% of bikes on the road. And 57% of fatal sportbike crashes were speed-related compared to 29% for non-sportbikes.

A detailed analysis of 390 fatal motorcycle crashes in the San Francisco Bay Area 2005-2009 included 194 sportbike deaths, and excessive speed was often a contributing factor. Not just speed over the posted limit, but beyond the rider's ability to control or far greater than other traffic. Most often, speed caused the rider to run wide in a curve and hit an oncoming vehicle or fixed object. Nearly as often, riders lost control while riding in a straight line--some while stunting--and collided with another vehicle or fixed object. Others added their own reckless speed to the danger posed by inattentive drivers in a dense traffic environment to cause a crash. Some may dismiss these crashes, blaming them on immature riders. But those who die on sportbikes aren't all "kids." Among Bay Area sportbike riders killed, nearly half were over age 30.

The Right Choices

As you gain riding experience, you will come to understand that in spite of uncontrollable factors in the environment and unpredictable behavior of other motorists, good choices can still protect you. Gravel may lurk in a blind turn and drivers may turn left in front of you, but you can usually prepare for the unexpected, and prevent crashes or minimize injuries resulting from these unknowns. And preparation starts with skills, protective gear, and the right motorcycle.


Notes
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Last edited by DataDan; 06-17-2011 at 07:17 PM..
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Old 06-18-2011, 03:19 PM   #2
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What advice would you give to a new rider?


The Right Skills

If you've taken MSF in the past year or so, what skills and strategies you learned have most helped you to survive and to enjoy riding?

The Right Gear

If you have crashed, what piece of gear are you glad you were wearing?

The Right Bike

At the risk of starting an endless argument about 250 Ninjas, turbo Busas, and everything in between...What bike have you owned that you found particularly easy to develop new skills on? If you could jump into the Wayback Machine and travel back to when you were first learning to ride, what motorcycle would you take with you?
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Old 07-09-2011, 07:57 PM   #3
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The Right Gear, continued

Some years ago, after a brisk Saturday morning ride on my new-to-me RC30, I stopped at Mel's in Walnut Creek and sat down at the counter. As I waited for the lovely Joanne to serve my breakfast, an old guy sitting next to me asked, "Is all that really necessary?" It took a moment, but I realized that he was referring to my head-to-toe leather. I answered, "After you've been down once or twice, you come to appreciate it."

The first-hand experience of a crash is a powerful personal persuader, but how much good does protective motorcycle clothing really do? What hard evidence might convince someone who hasn't crashed that jacket, pants, boots, and gloves made for motorcycling are important? While helmets have been studied thoroughly, and both Hurt and MAIDS included brief conclusions about rider clothing, there hasn't been a scientific study focused on the performance of motorcycle apparel in real-world crashes. Now an Australian study fills that gap.

Method of the study

The study included 212 motorcyclists who crashed in the Australian Capital Territory (similar to the District of Columbia) 2008-2009, identified and recruited through hospital admissions and motorcycle repair shops. They were interviewed about themselves, their crashes, their gear, and their injuries, and their medical records were reviewed. Average rider age was mid 30s, 87% were men, half were on sportbikes, and 60% had a full license rather than a learner or provisional license (only 2% were unlicensed). Slightly more of the crashes were multiple-vehicle than single-vehicle, and in 9% the motorcycle hit an animal, usually a kangaroo (deer are not native to the continent). Fewer than half of the crashes occurred over 30mph. 23% of victims were admitted to the hospital, 58% received other medical treatment, and 18% were not treated at all. Australian law doesn't require protective gear other than a helmet, so the clothing choices found in the sample are much like you'd see at Alice's on a Sunday afternoon.

Results

The sample size and the variety of clothing among the subjects enabled researchers to reach definitive conclusions about gear effectiveness. The following table shows the percentage of victims who wore each kind of garment and the reduction of injuries in the protected area. Soft tissue injuries are abrasions, cuts, and bruises; open wounds just abrasions and cuts. Injuries prevented are in comparison to other garments worn by riders in the study. For example, injuries to riders in motorcycle jackets were compared to those in non-motorcycle jackets and other upper body garments.

garmentworn bysoft tissue injuries preventedopen wounds prevented
motorcycle jacket
11%
27%
58%
motorcycle jacket, armored
72%
33%
63%
motorcycle pants
25%
8%
38%
motorcycle pants, armored
10%
34%
59%
motorcycle gloves
36%
40%
70%
motorcycle gloves, armored
51%
62%
73%
motorcycle boots
8%
65%
(not significant)
motorcycle boots, armored
29%
69%
90%
non-motorcycle boots
27%
61%
76%

The protective capability of motorcycle gear shown in the study is striking. The authors write:
The reduced risk of hospitalization observed in this study suggests that motorcycle clothing can significantly reduce the severity of injuries in crashes. While the greatest benefits observed were in relation to the prevention of soft tissue, and particularly open wound, injuries, this is not a trivial outcome. Such injuries are rarely life threatening, but can have serious consequences for the motorcyclist such as opportunistic infections, scarring, loss of mobility and longer term disability...

The most important result relates to the contribution of body armour, which was associated with substantial reductions in the risk of any injury in crashes when other factors such as speed and type of impact were controlled. This is the first evidence of the effectiveness of body armour from crash studies, although it has previously shown promise in laboratory tests.
However, the study found no significant benefit in preventing fractures:
Despite the reduced risk of any injuries when wearing body armour, the benefits could not be detected specifically in relation to fractures. Given the relatively low occurrence of fractures, compared to soft tissue injuries, in unprotected motorcyclists the sample size was likely too small to be able to detect any such difference.
Nor did back armor prevent back injuries:
Small numbers may also explain the lack of effect for back armour. However, other research suggests that most motorcycle-crash back injuries are caused by bending and torsional forces, not direct impacts to the spine. The back sprain injuries in those wearing foam inserts may be due to such bending and twisting forces.
Surprisingly, though boots protected well against foot and ankle injuries, they didn't have to be motorcycle boots:
While motorcycle boots were not associated with a significant reduction in risk of hospitalization [since that can result from other kinds of injuries], the results did confirm the benefits of motorcycle boots and, in fact, any type of sturdy boots compared to shoes such as joggers, It would appear that the basic elements of protection are not unique to motorcycle boots, but can be provided by other boots...
A disappointing discovery in the study is the number of failures of protective clothing, which the researchers defined as a hole worn in the protective material or an opened seam. More than one-fourth of jackets, pants, and gloves showed this kind of damage. Interestingly, they found that armor sometimes functioned as backup abrasion protection--apart from its main role as impact protection--when the primary material wore through.

Get your ass in gear

This study is a real eye-opener, demonstrating a significant real-world benefit for protective gear. In addition, it shows that all gear is not the same--quality counts.

For more on the benefit of motorcycle gear from a woman who learned the hard way, visit Rock the Gear.

For background on materials and construction techniques used for protective gear see Lee Parks' book Total Control. It's a riding skills book, but Lee's chapter on gear has great nuts-and-bolts info that will help you choose quality products.


Do you have special knowledge about the construction of motorcycle protective gear--in particular, about brands and their advantages? If so, post them up. I'm not inviting shameless product promotion, but solid information that will help a rider choose good gear at a good price.
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Old 07-12-2011, 11:07 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
What advice would you give to a new rider?


The Right Skills

If you've taken MSF in the past year or so, what skills and strategies you learned have most helped you to survive and to enjoy riding?
I have done a very good job of predicting potentially bad situations. Thinking about how and why people drive the way they do, and how and why motorcycles are involed in traffic accidents has helped me to avoid a lot of the situations that result in crashes.

For instance, many streets and freeway features aren't designed well enough for the traffic that they encounter. If there is a short onramp that makes it difficult for cars to merge onto the freeway, it creates a situation where cars will be braking suddenly or swerving into other lanes. Knowing where those spots are will help you plan to avoid being caught in the mess.

You can't change the way people drive. You can only think about why they do the things that they do.

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Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
The Right Gear

If you have crashed, what piece of gear are you glad you were wearing?
I have been lucky in the fact that I have never needed more gear that what I was wearing at the time.

But looking at the rash marks and gouges that have been on the faceshields and chinbars of the helmets that I have crashed in...a full face helmet is mandatory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DataDan View Post
The Right Bike

At the risk of starting an endless argument about 250 Ninjas, turbo Busas, and everything in between...What bike have you owned that you found particularly easy to develop new skills on? If you could jump into the Wayback Machine and travel back to when you were first learning to ride, what motorcycle would you take with you?
A dirtbike

I tried to answer this question with one of the street bikes that I have owned. But honestly, the best way to learn how to ride a bike is on the dirt.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:27 PM   #5
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Here's my personal experience; not sure what I'd do differently in hindsight.

I have been mentoring a new rider friend in his late 50's since April 2010 after he successfully passed the MSF. I've been riding 30+ years, well over 100k miles, taken CLASS and the Cal S'bike School several times each over the years, with 2 crashes, neither that resulted in an ambulance ride but had served to slow me down over the years and had proved to me the value of good gear.

The first few days we spent about 6 hours down at the MSF parking lot at the Sonoma County fairgrounds, him riding my DRZ400SM which is a great learner bike, (as well as being a hoot for veteran riders).

From there we slowly progressed on rides with me mostly leading; no major events though he did drop the bike twice at 0 mph; no big deal as the DRZ400SM doesn't mind being dropped at slow speed. No damage whatsoever, other than to his ego.

Gear wise I had given him my 5 year old Arai, my 25 year old custom Bates leather jacket, (I was 160lbs when I had it made...didn't really fit my now 200lb frame and was happy to give it a good home), added an Aerostich back protector to the jacket, some Bates deerskin gloves I rarely wore because they were white and my old pair of Draggin' Jeans that were a bit tight for me but still serviceable.

By late summer he had progressed very very well in our regular rides in the tight twisties of Sonoma County, (including such hairy roads as St Helena Road, King's Ridge, Fort Ross Road, Coleman Valley road and their ilk), had a good grasp on counter steering (as you must on those kind of roads) so in November he found a like new FZ6r on CL for a song. I rode it back from Oakland for him, (great bike, again, fun for new riders and veterans alike), and proceeded to ride with him through the winter and spring.

Main problem was that, especially when he led, he would ride too fast for the conditions, perhaps leaving himself a 2 second sight line, (despite my trying to drum into his head the need to maintain a 4 second sight line by slowing down when vision became limited) and his late apex technique left something to be desired, as did his approaches to blind rises, (he would often ride in the center of the lane not anticipating an approaching car passing a bicyclist and such). I kept hammering him on these issues and let him lead less as a result, asking him to follow my lines. We did constant debriefs after rides and while I had lent him my copy of Proficient Motorcycling, he had really only skimmed it, though I was doing my best to impart the wisdom of the book's approach.

This past April, after a 60 mile ride, including the smooth part of Skagg's, and shortly after yet another debrief, while following, he completely blew a tricky right hander on West Dry Creek Road resulting in a broken collarbone and 4 cracked ribs.

Here's details of that crash:

Tight blind right hand turn, the kind of turns we've done together probably thousands of times, and discussed endlessly.

You need to approach that sort of corner quite slowly, or brake hard well before it, to maintain four seconds of vision so that you don't get surprised.

I'm guessing Gary just came in a bit too fast, or was distracted by the tree at the apex, (which is what he said right after the crash), because the road took a slight left to get around a large oak and then a sharp right; the skidmark went straight, but, wierdly, the bike was on its LEFT side just off the pavement, which means Gary somehow high sided, (ie. that happens when the rear end is coming around, suddenly "catches" and tosses the rider up and over the bike), and landed perpendicular to the bike, head farthest away, about 15 feet from the bike which means he had some decent air time!

The skid marks tell me he hammered the rear brake, which goes against everything he'd been taught.

I didn't see his crash because I was leading, and, to be honest, at that point I was not going all that fast because the road was so tight you kind of couldn't.

But, just after I realized he was no longer in my mirrors, and was about to pull a U-turn, a bicycle and car went by the other way and went past Gary's bike on its side by the road before me.

Neither stopped.

They could not see Gary though, because another tree would have blocked their view of his prone body...but they went right past the downed bike.

His bike was remarkably unscathed; I rode it back and he rode my DRZ, (thank goodness I didn't have my literbike as I would not have let him ride that). The reason for the lack of damage was that he had slowed the bike considerably before being tossed and a month prior we had installed some "no cut" frame sliders that did a beautiful job and are still perfectly serviceable.

Left half of the handlebar was bent back to the tank and the left peg was broken and useless so I had to keep my left foot on the stub of the peg to shift.

Minor scrape on his helmet on the left side, (he bought a new one), gloves a little scuffed, jacket barely scuffed, Kevlar riding jeans (Draggin' Jeans) in perfect shape, so at least no road rash!

Very, very, very fortunate that there was no traffic coming the other way on that very lightly traveled road.

We'd already ridden 60 miles and we'd talked about looking 4 seconds ahead, adjusting your speed, and trying to brake in a straight line before the corner to maintain 4 seconds of vision.

Perhaps Gary let his mind wander.

Not sure.

On our ride yesterday to the place where he crashed he was riding in a far less aggressive manner, as one would expect, and the way I'd been trying to drill into his head prior to his brain fart...riding with a 4 second sight line, taking a late apex with a slow in/fast out (if possible) approach, and staying well to the right when approaching blind crests.

And he's been studiously reading Proficient Motorcycling and discussing the chapters with me.

I think he had a relatively "cheap" wake up call, all things considered.

Here's some pictures.

The first one shows the bent handlebar, the broken left peg and if you look closely you can see that the fairing was a bit unpinned as an underneath support mount made of plastic was broken and had to be replaced. Very minor damage all things considered...and thanks to the frame sliders.

The second one is the approach to the turn; this was one of the very few on that road with an actual sign telling you which way the road goes!

The third one shows the skidmark going straight off.

The fourth one shows you how far he flew. My BMW is parked where his bike ended up lying on its left side and I placed my helmet on the ground in the approximate spot where his head was when I found him...obviously hugely lucky no cars were coming and also that he didn't fly into the tree! freaked
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Old 07-13-2011, 06:58 AM   #6
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Thanks for that, Geoff.

He had been trained, he was wearing proper gear, and the motorcycle doesn't seem to be a factor. But still he crashed and was injured. It can happen, even after taking reasonable precautions.

A factor that could have contributed is his position behind you. When a noob is following rather than leading, he may not be using his eyes as he should. Focused on the lead rider, he's not looking far enough ahead or planning his own line, so he's going to have some surprises. OTOH, I understand your preference to lead given this rider's tendency to ride faster than the sightline permitted. Either way there's a risk.
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:25 AM   #7
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I would like to suggest this study as an additional consideration for "right gear".

http://www.bikerhiway.com/motorcycle...ity_study.html

Hi-viz gear injury reductions seen in the study:

Hi-Viz gear (jacket or vest) 37% lower risk of injury
White helmet 24%, light colored helmet 19% lower risk (vs dark colored helmet).
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Old 07-13-2011, 08:47 AM   #8
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I would like to suggest this study as an additional consideration for "right gear".

http://www.bikerhiway.com/motorcycle...ity_study.html

Hi-viz gear injury reductions seen in the study:

Hi-Viz gear (jacket or vest) 37% lower risk of injury
White helmet 24%, light colored helmet 19% lower risk (vs dark colored helmet).
Thanks for that. Conspicuity is another important consideration in choosing gear.
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Old 07-13-2011, 10:24 AM   #9
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About that "gear" thing

Along with the instructive story above and Dan's data regarding gear in a crash, I thought I'd share some details to help dispel any myths around "I don't need all of that if I'm not going very fast".

What follows are pictures of my gear after a recent lowside. I never left the paved surface, so the complications and added probability of injury from trees, guard rails, fences, etc. were not a factor. I think it's important to mention that when we think of "impact protection" it's often in terms of hitting obstacles. The thing I'd have all remember is that hitting the pavement at speed is a wrenching impact that can be far in excess of the effects of gravity alone.

Anyhow, this is what happens when you hit pavement at 30 MPH. That's right, only 30 mph - confirmed by doing the math/physics based on the independent lengths of rider and bike slides. Thirty. Three-oh.

Any place you see abrasion should be equated with potentially missing skin. Also of interest - there's damage and abrasion everywhere. You don't just slide on one part of your body.


Alpinestars Street Cargo pants. In addition to general abrasion, note the tear-through in the top layer in several spots. There is modest armor in the knees that actually worked quite well. It'd be nice if gear manufacturers started including hip armor/padding as a matter of course since that's where my prettiest bruises were.


The pants again. Note how abrasion has taken the top layer of stitching off the coin pocket. Note too, that the pants held together. This was actually a significant contact point in the hit/slide.


Sidi boots. Note how the toe slider and air vent are ground down. Abrasion on the ankle as well where the pants rode up a bit.


Alpinestars leather jacket (I forget the model). This was the first and most severe point of impact. It just looks a bit scuffed. Seams are still in great shape.


Jacket sleeve. More sliding than impact here, so lots of scuffing. The outer stitching on the zipper is gone. This is why you want all main seams double-stitched with one layer of stitching hidden.




Racer "High Racer" gloves. Places to look at are the abrasion on knuckles and the way the palm sliders are severely worn down. Also note the significant abrasion damage on the wrist of the right glove. I believe that I can safely say that without the gloves it would have been a case of missing meat, not just missing skin.


And, of course, the helmet. If you think this doesn't look bad, imagine what the side of your head would look like without it.


So, while (but for the helmet) we're likely not talking life vs death with this one, I hope the pictures and brief descriptions help folks understand that even relatively low speed crashes can leave you a bloody mess without good gear.
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Old 07-13-2011, 04:04 PM   #10
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I hope the pictures and brief descriptions help folks understand that even relatively low speed crashes can leave you a bloody mess without good gear.
This is a splendid job of telling a very important story. I will be making references to it. Thank you.
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Old 07-22-2011, 08:45 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Ogg View Post
If you think this doesn't look bad, imagine what the side of your head would look like without it.

So, while (but for the helmet) we're likely not talking life vs death with this one, I hope the pictures and brief descriptions help folks understand that even relatively low speed crashes can leave you a bloody mess without good gear.

took a spill going in a regular neighborhood, regular idiots, and just a helmet and a sweatshirt on my moms Honda CMX 250. i was somewhat careful, but the mom in the TAHOE XL wasn't, she was on the phone. i was only going 20, her maybe 30. she ran a stop sign and barely missed me and i tried to avoid her and that ended up in a pretty nice rash on my ass. couldnt ride for a good 9 days or so. Gear is a MUST. safe riding
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A bike is not a Liability, the person riding it is the liability. The bike only does what you tell it to.
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Old 07-25-2011, 09:56 AM   #12
Wicked4Racin
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: San Jose
Motorcycles: Suzuki ...and a few others for different days
Name: Josh
Get some gear and dont let your guard down for a sec. people in cages are nuts, just have to try and react before they do, that way you have plenty of safe space between you and them
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Old 07-28-2011, 07:38 AM   #13
neox.286
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Tracy
Motorcycles: 2003 GSX-R 600 (Soon to be 750)
Name: Robert
I can't even begin to imagine what those crashes listed above must have been like if they didn't have their gear on. I've only been downed once, but I've always been very cautious and have always worn all my gear. Since it took me a while to build up the funds I needed to get my first bike I was constantly doing research into what else I had to get with it before I ever got on it. I was constantly at cycle gear looking at gear, and talking with other riders to see what they recommended in the way of gear that helped them when they went down, and I constantly look back at that as time well spent.

When I went down it was of my own accord, and my own lapse in focus. My second day out after ignoring everyone's suggestions not to start on a 600cc sportbike I dumped the clutch by accident and went straight into a curb merely ten feet away and was thrown from the bike. I was fortunate enough to have had a soft grass patch to land upon, but had it been any other curb in the parking lot I might not have been lucky enough to have had that. I learned my lesson the hard way and immediately decided that my best course of action would be to learn how to handle the bike with a little more care and caution.

The next day (after replacing my bent front rim and verifying everything else was okay) I immediately dedicated it to an abandoned open parking lot to better learn the throttle response, clutch play, and tire response needed when handling such a powerful bike and since that I always rode with caution on my mind before thrill.

While gear didn't necessarily play a huge factor in whether or not I would have fractured a limb, or possibly damaged my back if I had landed on pavement (as there wasn't any real 'abrasive' motion, just blunt force), it still showed me that even at low speed you have no idea what kind of momentum your body is under and you never know exactly what your body might end up hitting because of it. If there had been a fire hydrant, or if I had landed on the edge of the curb, I might be singing a paralytic tune today. My luck was just that: luck, and it is not something to count on.

Know your limits, and know what it is you should be riding at your skill level. Just because you can afford a liter bike doesn't mean you should as a beginner, and just because you think stuff like this won't happen to you does not mean you should start off on a 600cc bike.
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Old 08-23-2011, 09:23 AM   #14
DamianDee
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Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carlsbad, CA
Motorcycles: GSXR 700
Name:
This is a great thread for a new rider! I never knew how many injuries were prevented by wearing boots, I would have never known!
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Old 06-05-2012, 12:02 PM   #15
Larell
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Oceanside
Motorcycles: KTM 950 SM-R (wrecked)
Name: Larell
I am a beginner who went down on my first ride a few months ago. It was an issue of throttle and clutch control on my first ride on the bike. I was leaving a stoplight and accidentally wheelied lost control and the bike went down on my knee somehow. I was wearing Dainese Avro jacket, Sartso Killer Jeans, Shift Racing Kicker boots and Knox crossbrace (large) knee/shin armor. Alpinestars GPX gloves and Bell Vortex helmet (don't laugh!).

Every single piece of my gear touched down and I was maybe going 20 mph...not even through the intersection yet! Not to beat a dead horse, but ARMOR is the way to go in conjunction with abrasion protection. My knee went down HARD and still caused a contusion even with the knee armor. Without it I would probably would have been a cripple. People who ride in regular Levi's are crazy. I won't wear my Kevlar jeans without armor when riding.
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