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Old 06-10-2019, 06:37 PM   #16
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I drove to the Atlantic coast and back in 4 days out and three days back. About 2900 miles using my routes. Pretty sure I could do it on a bike in double that time. 3 days was pushing but 4 was pretty easy. I say do it but do your homework too.
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:46 PM   #17
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+1. Are you familiar with a Vstrom? If you have a mechanical issue, do you know how to possibly troubleshoot it?

You can attempt to do it however you like, the experience will be quite different depending on your experience level and resourcefulness. 3 days riding 300 miles is quite different than 150 mile day trip.

It's definitely doable but if you do a couple small overnight trips, you'll learn quickly what you may/may not need to make the trip much more comfortable and realistic.
I've spent quite a bit of time fixing cars and motorcycles. I'm pretty mechanically inclined. That said, I don't plan on bringing any tools. If the bike breaks in a serious way, I'll have the owner pay for it getting fixed somewhere.

I think if I do 300 miles/day then it'll be fine. I'll wake up, eat some breakfast, ride 100-200 miles, get lunch somewhere and look around, ride another 100-200 miles and call it a day. It's not that crazy especially if I can go 60mph+.

I think you guys are really underestimating the difference in toll that a sportbike takes on your body over a bunch of backroads vs cruising on an upright bike.

Leaning over 40+ degrees and all hunched up and trying to use your core for 2-3 hours really takes it out of you. I am not planning on experiencing that with the v-strom because... it's upright.

Last edited by bradlys; 06-10-2019 at 06:47 PM..
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:46 PM   #18
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Is he going to pay for your flight up? What about your costs if the bike breaks down?

As others have said, do your homework on how others have done this very well-known ride. Rocket science it ain't. But neither is it a newb's ride.

If the bike has been serviced up there, and has good enough tires to make it back it'd be worth considering. And if you decide it's not your thing, PM me. I have nothing but time, and I'd do this ride for airfare up and a piece of whatever the bike is worth when your friend sells it.
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Old 06-10-2019, 06:50 PM   #19
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I've spent quite a bit of time fixing cars and motorcycles. I'm pretty mechanically inclined. That said, I don't plan on bringing any tools. If the bike breaks in a serious way, I'll have the owner pay for it getting fixed somewhere.

I think if I do 300 miles/day then it'll be fine. I'll wake up, eat some breakfast, ride 100-200 miles, get lunch somewhere and look around, ride another 100-200 miles and call it a day. It's not that crazy especially if I can go 60mph+.

I think you guys are really underestimating the difference in toll that a sportbike takes on your body over a bunch of backroads vs cruising on an upright bike.

Leaning over 40+ degrees and all hunched up and trying to use your core for 2-3 hours really takes it out of you. I am not planning on experiencing that with the v-strom because... it's upright.
Dude. No offense, but you asked a bunch of guys (and girls) here with a BUNCH more experience than you, they gave you an answer you didn't like, and now you're arguing with them.
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:06 PM   #20
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So, for everyone who thinks its a bad idea, what do you envision as the failure mode? It's not like riding a moto is especially difficult or requires great physical fitness.

Sure, he could break down, but so what? Just becomes another good story. It's also a V-strom, a modern, reliable, easy to service and find parts for bike, so anything short of major engine failure shouldn't be too hard to sort out.

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Old 06-10-2019, 07:11 PM   #21
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So, for everyone who thinks its a bad idea, what do you envision as the failure mode? It's not like riding a moto is especially difficult or requires great physical fitness.

Sure, he could break down, but so what? Just becomes another good story.
Yep. If it was in bum fuck middle of nowhere in some desert or something then yeah probably not best of ideas without some prep. This? Mostly good roads, not too far from civilization? Meh give it a shot. Bring enough layers to handle rain and crap and give it a go. Just make sure owner does maintaince on it first,
or at least fresh tires and oil.
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:25 PM   #22
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I wouldn't do it without a couch cushion tied to the seat.
Even then I wouldn't even consider it. Maybe in a Cadillac.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:00 PM   #23
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I was presented with a similar situation last year. I got an offer from MotoGuild to transport a bike from SF to AK. The timing was epic because it was right when I secured 4 months off work but I would only have 10 days to do it based on my last day of work and when they needed the bike up there. I spoke with friends who did the route years ago and one basically said in 10 days it would be a slog and if I didnt have time to take detours and site see it would be pretty lame since the bulk of the Hwy is like riding the I5, but with trees. I think they spent like a month on their trip.

Pull up street view on random parts of the route and decide for yourself.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:03 PM   #24
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Do it, it might change your life and make that $2 million dollar house seem a lot less important.

Its a front country trip on mostly paved roads, not some remote backcountry adventure, and your riding a motorcycle, not hiking. 300 miles a day is easy if you are doing nothing but riding, especially on highway. That is a rolling average of only 30mph if you spend 10 hours a day on the road. If the bike breaks, ditch it and book a flight, or rent a uhaul, or hitchhike, or whatever, Breaking down is fun and forces you to make friends.

Even if it goes completely sideways I doubt you will regret it 20 years from now. You could crash, but its probably safer than riding around here, so you are already ok with that risk.
This in spades! As part of the agreement the owner has the bike serviced with fresh rubber and gone through. It'll be the trip of a lifetime good bad or otherwise. I'm sitting at a bar in Portland after my first big trip out of Sacramento of 2 days of 350 and 480 miles on a versys which is similar to the V-Strom. They're long days but it's worth it.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:08 PM   #25
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As mentioned in a few ways- you got a whole lot of logistics to work out long before you decide. Operations, replenishment, emergency (real), urgent issue (non emergent- but you've stopped moving), fuel stops, weather, communications, navigation...I could go on and on.

Or, just grab your Visa card and go for it- post pics!
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:17 PM   #26
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he doesn't want to ride it back down and wants someone to ride it back (and maybe give him some $$ for it but who knows how much).
No thanks. You're doing him a favor by bringing it back and he wants you to pay? Have him get it shipped back instead.
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Old 06-10-2019, 08:55 PM   #27
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I was presented with a similar situation last year. I got an offer from MotoGuild to transport a bike from SF to AK. The timing was epic because it was right when I secured 4 months off work but I would only have 10 days to do it based on my last day of work and when they needed the bike up there. I spoke with friends who did the route years ago and one basically said in 10 days it would be a slog and if I didnt have time to take detours and site see it would be pretty lame since the bulk of the Hwy is like riding the I5, but with trees. I think they spent like a month on their trip.

Pull up street view on random parts of the route and decide for yourself.
Played enough of the "guess where you are in the world" Google Maps game to know this already. It's definitely just I5 with more trees and nothingness. That's pretty much all Canadian roads as far as I've ever seen. I did research a long time ago about it. It's why I never wanted to go both ways. I wanted to really ride all the way *to the top*. Get to the most north I could. But this wouldn't be it and I'd need a much more adventurey bike for me to do that. (This bike isn't going to have knobby tires and the level of range I'd be comfortable with) This opportunity has sparked an interest of mine in that maybe I should look into getting an R1200GSA or something and doing some real adventuring. Some day.

Not sure when that will be. I need more stories to tell my kids before I have them...

Also, yes, I am not doing this if the guy wants me to pay him. I've decided that's stupid. I'd consider it for free (pay my own gas and what not) but the only thing that I've worried about is that 10 days isn't really enough to enjoy the splendor. If I wanted to spend solid time hiking certain trails and what not - it won't happen. I'd like to spend some time doing photography and seeing things - really being able to take my time and visit all the sights. I don't want to have to visit these places again until climate change has altered them significantly. In particular, I have no interest in regular hiking. I'm someone who's more interested in dangerous hikes. (Think angel's landing covered in snow - that was fun and kept it interesting!)

Last edited by bradlys; 06-10-2019 at 08:56 PM..
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:33 AM   #28
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At 300 miles per day you'll have time to make a few stops to see things each day, but only short hikes if you want to get very far off of the road.

Be aware that in some areas the towns might be spaced further apart, so some days will require longer distances just to make the next place to stay. You need to find out if you'll need reservations at whatever motels you want to stay at. I don't know how it is on that route, but in 2015 when I spent a month driving all around the western states visiting all of the national parks I discovered that you had better have a reservation for Saturday night or you might end up sleeping in the car. In your case I don't know where you would sleep if all of the rooms are taken.

I found while planning every day using Google Maps, that I was only about 80% accurate for where I actually ended up, or in my case, the actual route taken. You won't have the route issue until you're closer to the US border.

I would second the suggestion to do a couple of 500 mile days on a motorcycle just to know what you'll be up against. My backside can't handle a bunch of 300 mile days back to back to back. I just did a 250 mile trip that included about 100 miles of dirt roads and I didn't want to sit down for a while after that. Maybe your butt muscles are in better shape than mine, though, but you won't know until you've tried it.

If you want a memorable adventure, I say go for it. But make sure you have plans for various things going wrong.
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:57 AM   #29
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Perhaps I'm mistaken, but your posts suggest you're really only doing this to say that you've done it. Maybe post some cool selfies on IG...

Riding to places a long ways away, even on the Candian version if I-5 isn't about the cool pictures and "I've been there status." There is so much to see and do up there, or down here, and even along I-5, that a person who WANTS to make the trip could spend a lifetime getting there and still want to go back because theres more to see.

I think that you have a good opportunity to make this an epic trip, if you decide to do it. But that won't happen of you ride 300 miles a day. You'll never get off of I-5. If you want to really experience the places through which you'll travel while still maintaining your timeline, you're gonna have to put in longer days, so you can put in some shorter days.

Find a few places that are really cool to explore. Like Hyder AK, which you'll never make on 300 miles a day, and make a plan to head over there. Do two 450 mile days so you can make up for the one day of taking that detour. Do a short day and stop to explore, and then get up early and put in some miles. 200 miles before breakfast on a travel day. Then another 200 before lunch. It can be done.

You're going to run into long stretches without lodging. So unless you're carrying a sleeping bag you may have to stop short or ride long anyway. On top of that, choices are limited. Will there even be a room?

Here's my suggestion: pack a small tool roll, some lightweight rain gear, a tent and a sleeping bag, and a Camelback. Then ride. Just go for it. But remember to stop and smell the roses. You have unlimited PTO.... what could possibly go wrong? If you're looking for an adventure before you get all responsible with home ownership and shit, this is it.

Do it and dont look back. You'll learn more about yourself being alone in your helmet and the massive great white north in 10 days that you will in a lifetime of therapy.
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Old 06-11-2019, 05:22 AM   #30
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I find on long multi day trips itís nice to have a day every other day or so to stop
and smell the roses. I would not be interested in spending every day just making time and distance.
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